Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!

I made a stupid mistake and would like advise


xinnix

Recommended Posts

I bought a 357 S&W 686, Before I got my Hornady reloading manual I was given information at the gun club I belong to that a good load for these Hornady Hollow Base Wad Cutter is 3.0 grains of Bulls Eye powder. I got my Hornady book in the mail and it says that I am at the max load for that bullet. I was stupid foolish and a few other words I will not say. I always check my loads in a book before making them up. I was in a hurry to make the bullets and trusted the person that gave me the load data. I made up the whole box of Hornady HBWC the good thing is I loaded them in 357 magnum brass rather than 38 special brass so the pressures should be lower. My concern is being at the max is shooting the center of the bullet out and leaving a doughnut in the barrel. There are three things I can do. 1, throw them out and chock up the loss of the new brass to stupidity 2,Use a bullet puller and bang them all out. I do not consider this an option as it would take to long and I would be sore as heck from banging out that many bullets. 3,Go to the range and shoot each bullet single action and check the target for a good hole with my binoculars or spotting scope and if in doubt run my brass squib rod down the barrel after each shot. I made up a whole box of 250 Hornady HBWC. I have purchased other HBWC that were less expensive and I can see that the Hornady bullets are made better and I loaded them with Accurate powder at 2.7 grains and they shoot great.

So I am asking if anyone has loaded HBWC in 357 magnum brass and had a problem blowing the centers out???? I am open to suggestions and am I being to worried as it does say it is a load in the Hornay book and I know that the powder did not shift. The Dillon XL650 is a great machine and I have never had a powder shift once set up. I usually check the powder load after 50 rounds and it is always spot on.

The next inexperienced 357 magnum bone head move is I bought a bunch of hard cast SWC 150 bullets and loaded them with a heavey crimp. I jut assumed that you used a crimp on a 357 load. I could not group these bullets at 25 yards for the life of me and I am using a Ultradot red dot sight on the S&W 686 from a rest I talked to the gentleman that makes the bullets that I bought and he informed me that you never use a hard crimp on a lead bullet because once you damage the lead bullet in any way it is not going to be accurate. I have a lot of these made in new Star Line brass and would like to pull the bullets and re-size them and start over. I have 1000 of these made up.

So my question is is there a bullet puller die that I can mount in my Dillon XL 650 to pull the bullets using the press? If there is can you please send me a link so I can purchase one. It would be worth the savings in powder recovery and primer recovery verses just winging them down range and not enjoying shooting them.

So can someone please tell me how foolish I was. I have said it enough and help me with my problem with a bullet puller solution?

Thanks a lot

B

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Try shooting a few of the wadcutter load, and inspect the bore. Your load isn't that hot, especially for a 357 case, and I'd be surprised if you blow the skirts off the bullets with it. The only way you distorted the SWCs, is if the bullet doesn't have a crimping groove, or if you really cranked down on the crimp. Is your barrel leading when you shoot these loads? This could be a bullet fit, or alloy issue too, as are most accuracy & performance problems with cast bullets. You'll need to use an interia type puller for cast bullets, the collet types won't work if you're pulling against a heavy crimp.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I shoot 2.9 of Bullseye in my S&W 52 I remember experimenting shooting this same load in my S&W 19 with .357 brass in several PPC matches but that was 20 years ago and I'm not trusting my memory to be exact on that so...

I would suggest putting a target up at about 20 ft. if your range will allow so you can see the holes well and shoot a few blown skirts should show in a few cylinders if it will be a problem. if they chrono at under 900 fps. you should be ok also..(high end of "Mid-Range" )

I am pretty sure Bullseye is stable in larger cases with low powder charge weights unlike some powders.

all my reloads .357 Mags included get taper crimped basic setting .003" under resized size so resize an empty measure casemouth and subtract .003" they don't move under recoil 158 LSWC with stout charge of 2400 nice fireball..

Once you crimp a slug it gets distorted, pulling and recrimping may not solve your accuracy issue with this batch of bullets. pull a few and measure to see if they are badly distorted

times like these are the only down side to a progressive press,.. they let you make alot of ammo quick and if your settings are off alot of bad/questionable ammo quick I tend to load develop on an old Lyman Spartan press, yes it is slower but I have caught a few oopses over the years.

John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is what Alliant shows for the 148 HBWC in their data:

OAL Barrel Primer Powder Grn Velocity

1.155 6 CCI 500 Bullseye 3.1 799

This is for 38 special brass, I can't see how loading this in a 357 case could make it anything but safer. I would shoot them without worry in any 357 I own.

David

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...

Most collet bullet pullers won't work with lead bullets. I'd get a $20-ish impact puller and just pull them that way. Won't take long, and the lesson will imprint itself more firmly in your mind. :roflol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dont worry about pulling it. Just shoot em. You are not going to hurt anything in a modern reputable pistol with any load that is published in any book.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You learned the hard way. NEVER ask anyone for their favorite load and NEVER use a load someone gives you.

That's a little overboard. Using someone else's load data is fine...as long as you sanity check it first by checking one or more published sources (loading manual, powder manufacturer's web site, etc.) to make sure it's within the recommended range for that bullet weight and powder.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dont worry about pulling it. Just shoot em. You are not going to hurt anything in a modern reputable pistol with any load that is published in any book.

:surprise:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have the guy that's messing around with your girl shoot'em. :devil:

Anyway, that gun can take it. I hate those locks though.

PS. NEVER believe anyone at a gun club. It takes a good man to admit a mistake, you are on the right track. :cheers:

Edited by John Wayne
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Another thing I learned is never believe a recipe from HandLoads.com if it is from a guest. Make sure it is done buy the powder manufacture like Alliant. Even then get all of your Load data books to verify. With a Dillon 650 you can crank out a lot of mistakes FAST! I am lucky to only be 15 minutes from the gun club so I can run off 20 bullets in a few loads and test them almost immediately.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The only recipes I trust are the ones I developed. I will look at a book/online manual for the average starting point, but until I run them through my gun and across my chrono they are suspect. I will not mass produce any load until i have had a chance to check it out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 grains of Bullseye, 148 wadcutter, .357 brass is peanuts. Go shooting.

If you crimped those semiwadcutters so hard as to hurt their accuracy, pulling them will recover your brass and powder but leave you with scrap lead.

I'd use them for something like 10 yard double action practice where any damage won't show up.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dont worry about pulling it. Just shoot em. You are not going to hurt anything in a modern reputable pistol with any load that is published in any book.

This.

AND:

http://www.alliantpowder.com/reloaders/recipedetail.aspx?gtypeid=1&weight=158&shellid=28&bulletid=30

I bet you could load double that charge and not harm the gun.

In the future, do NOT use .38 loads in .357 brass. Pressure is a function of force AND area. Changing the area significantly will also change the pressure. Load data for .38 special is at the very most a very general guideline for .357 magnum.

The actual max load for bullsye with that bullet in .357 is likely somewhere in the mid-4 grain range.

If the biggest reloading mistake you ever make is loading a very light .38 load in magnum brass, consider yourself very lucky.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some will also jump on me for this BUT:

ADVICE (S sound) recommendation regarding a decision or course of conduct : My advice is to give all your guns to Poppa Bear and get a new one.

ADVISE (Z sound) to give information or notice to : inform <advise them of their rights>

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most lead bullet loads from the major bullet makers are limited by velocity, not pressure.

Also, if you have them loaded in 357 Magnum cases, you have more volume than if used in 38 Special cases.

My Hornady book does not show loads for the 148 HBWC in the 357 magnum, but I would expect it would not show any more velocity than that shown in the 38 Special.

Guy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...