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Public range practice


jericho76

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Hi there all.

I am very new to shooting. Still waiting for my CCW to come through, but get to the range occasionally with a friend and his guns. Obviously once I am legal to own a pistol,I want to/am going to get into some sort of competitive shooting,depending on what is in my area. My question is what sort of drills can I do at the average range that doesn't allow for movement or holster draws? Do most people get their movement practice in with dry fire drills at home?

If there is anyone from CT is reading this, do you know of any clubs involved with either IDPA or USPSA in lower half of CT?

I am so happy to have found this sight. So many answers to so many questions.

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In the beginning I don't think it is that important to draw from the holster at the range. The mechanics of drawing should be learned dry fireing. One of the most important aspects of the draw is quickly seeing the sights and getting off a smooth and quick first shot. You can work on this at any range. Simply start with the gun at the retention position. This is where your weak hand would come to the grip during the draw. From that position press out the gun, see the sights and press the trigger. Fire only one shot then reset. Only go as fast as you can get good hits. With practice you start seeing the sights faster and getting good hits quicker. Make sure your mechanics are good, your vision is good and trigger pull is smooth.

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You can improvise several drills by getting creative with the target. 3 Metrics at 7 yards, spaced 3 yards apart can be imitated with some proper scaling and ranging. The same can be said for plate racks.

I will say that it behooves you to go beyond simply drawing outlines on the paper, as your eyes will not be able to find the proper index in most cases. You simply cannot see those little lines as clearly as the real, full sized object-- despite the similarities in size.

Some tracing and cut outs would go a long way. You can also work on transitions (including "big" to "small") with all sorts of different stickers, pasters, marker work, etc. In reality, you're only limited by your own level of creativity!

A real math whiz (or someone with more skills than every day stuff) could probably help you to perfectly scale your targets and distances based on what you have to work with. I've found that simply eyeballing it can produce pretty accurate results, but YMMV!

Just remember-- you'll have to REALLY nitpick your hits, as the bullet hole is gonna be huge compared to the target. This also means you can't get too crazy on your simulated distances, and you won't get as much use out of the really small targets before they're shot completely out.

TBH, there might be some discrepancies in your hits vs the actual trajectory out to your simulated range. I'll leave that to the geometry folks. At the very least, you can work on sight picture (as it will be consistent) and you can guarantee that perfect hits would indeed translate.

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Hi there all.

I am very new to shooting. Still waiting for my CCW to come through, but get to the range occasionally with a friend and his guns. Obviously once I am legal to own a pistol,I want to/am going to get into some sort of competitive shooting,depending on what is in my area. My question is what sort of drills can I do at the average range that doesn't allow for movement or holster draws? Do most people get their movement practice in with dry fire drills at home?

If there is anyone from CT is reading this, do you know of any clubs involved with either IDPA or USPSA in lower half of CT?

I am so happy to have found this sight. So many answers to so many questions.

Maybe the rules are different in CT, but you shouldn't need a CCW to be 'legal' to own a pistol/gun, you just can't carry it concealed until the CCW permit shows up.

On another note, there are tons of drills you can do even at public ranges that will help your core shooting skills. Dot drills (without the draw of course), transitions, long distance accuracy, reloads (careful with this one too, some dislike speed reloads), trigger prep, or just slow shooting but paying attention to what happens. Find some local clubs and go check them out during a match to see what its all about. More than likely when you see what USPSA or some other competitive shooting is like you'll walk away wondering how soon you can get into it for yourself.

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Our indoor range has two clips, 24" apart, for holding large paper targets.

Clip one USPSA or IDPA taget to each, by the head. And DO NOT SHOOT THE HEADS. Doing unconventional stuff like this will get you extra attention from the employees. So don't force them to come over and make you stop this, by putting holes 1" away from their metal target frames.

Simple drills with this? 2, 2, reload, 2, 2... or 2-reload-2 to the other target.

That gets you presentation, splits, transitions, and a reload.

Then throw six rounds in the mag. Shoot each target one time, going back and forth as fast as you can without missing the A-zone. I like to do this one with the A-zone cut out of the target. Mostly because I hate pasting.

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