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trigger sear engagement


texarkana

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When the trigger is pushed to the rear the trigger bar engages the bottom of the sear.

1. what is that portion of the sear called?

2. now for the dumb question. How important is the angle of that portion of the sear? Is that area one of the prepped areas of the sear?

Thanks Texarkana

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Q: What is that portion of the sear called?

A: I don't know what the "Official" Name is but I call it the "Trigger Bar Leg".

Q: How important is the angle of that portion of the sear?

A: The forward facing angle of the Trigger bar leg is very important. The forward facing surface of the Trigger bar leg sets the depth of the trigger will be in the trigger guard. The notch in the trigger bar pushes on this forward facing surface so its best if the face of it is at a the same angle as the trigger bar notch so the two parts meet consistently with a decent size contact patch. If the trigger bar leg face has an angled backwards cut to it the trigger bar notch will slip off of the trigger bar leg and put the trigger into a "Reset" condition. You will also have inconsistent trigger break and reset positions. Basically its best if the cut on the trigger bar leg is straight up and down so it engages the trigger bar notch correctly.

Q: Is that area one of the prepped areas of the sear?

A: Some times the trigger bar leg is prepped and other times its not. Its actually better to have it not prepped because you can have the full range of how much its cut back in order to tune the trigger depth within the trigger guard to perfectly meet your needs. Some people like the trigger really far back in the trigger guard and others like it really far forward. Having a lot of "Meat" on the trigger bar leg enables you to build the trigger depth to whatever you need. Once its cut back too far the only way to fix it is to have more steel welded back onto it.

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Q: What is that portion of the sear called?

A: I don't know what the "Official" Name is but I call it the "Trigger Bar Leg".

Q: How important is the angle of that portion of the sear?

A: The forward facing angle of the Trigger bar leg is very important. The forward facing surface of the Trigger bar leg sets the depth of the trigger will be in the trigger guard. The notch in the trigger bar pushes on this forward facing surface so its best if the face of it is at a the same angle as the trigger bar notch so the two parts meet consistently with a decent size contact patch. If the trigger bar leg face has an angled backwards cut to it the trigger bar notch will slip off of the trigger bar leg and put the trigger into a "Reset" condition. You will also have inconsistent trigger break and reset positions. Basically its best if the cut on the trigger bar leg is straight up and down so it engages the trigger bar notch correctly.

Q: Is that area one of the prepped areas of the sear?

A: Some times the trigger bar leg is prepped and other times its not. Its actually better to have it not prepped because you can have the full range of how much its cut back in order to tune the trigger depth within the trigger guard to perfectly meet your needs. Some people like the trigger really far back in the trigger guard and others like it really far forward. Having a lot of "Meat" on the trigger bar leg enables you to build the trigger depth to whatever you need. Once its cut back too far the only way to fix it is to have more steel welded back onto it.

WOW ! ! Great response and your statement definitely sounds right. In fact your description pertains to my problem. I will try to post a few pictures in a couple days. That is, as soon as I receive another sear. I am not qualified to weld material on the existing sear.

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