Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!

Redding Seating die


catwrench

Recommended Posts

Hi guys would i be wasting my money if i purchased the redding seating dies for my 9mm and 10mm from my brother inlaw or should i just stick with my dillon dies. all i really do is target shoot,i really don't see any advantage for me as for i reload range brass but i also have new starline 10mm. please give me your opinion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you are talking about the competition seating dies with the micrometer, they are invaluable if you change loads often. If you stick to one load, or only change loads maybe once or twice a year, stick with the Dillon dies.

The other reason to have the micrometer is if you are like me and are a clutz when it comes to using wrenches. Then setting the die once, and fine tuning with the micrometer prevents a lot of aggravation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes theses are the micrometer dies he has and i think i will purchase them from him.i like the idea of fine tuning the oal.even if they don't work out for me i can always resell them ,and go back to my dillon. yes i do change or try different bullets to see what works for me best.i only target shoot at the range. but i sure love working with the reloader when i get a chance.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I dont understand how it's so much more accurate. Im fairly new to reloading and from my experience everything isn't going to be to the exact .001 that I set it to. I reload with a Dillon 550 so I will refer to it. I use Dillon dies and I guess I just cant wrap my brain around this concept. If you set your die to seat you bullet lets say 1.450, I get a .002+/- variance. Now shooting a race pistol I guess I don't understand how a redding competition die will make that much of a difference. Maybe if you are shooting a match grade rifle in competition with targets over a 1,000 yards. In this situation a couple thousands will probably make a difference. So i guess i would like somebody to explain to me why it's so important.

Edited by cworks
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The redding micrometer die allows quick and accurate adjustment when going from one oal to the next.

I'm not concerned with .001 accuracy. Hell I'm happy if my bullets measure between 1.150 and 1.160 for my open gun.

One thing i have noticed is my finished rounds using the micrometer die is considerably more concentric than rounds made using a conventional seater die.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

oh ok. You must have a good eye, I cant really tell if mine are canted. One thing I do notice is that on some of my .40 rounds it seems like one side of the brass is bulged out from where the bullet has been seated. you think this is from the case not being pushed all the way into my shell plate?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a 3 ring binder that I have partitioned off into sections. One section is for 9mm, another section for .40 S and W, and so on and so forth. In MS Word, I created a form document....basically fill in the blank when it prompts me for info like " BULLET WEIGHT:____________ " , " POWDER TYPE:________" " POWDER WEIGHT:_______" .....etc.

Then at the bottom I have three columns where I record a string of 10 shots each over the chrono, then blanks for average velocity, standard deviation, and average power factor.

Up near the top of this form, I have a section cordoned off for a drawing or sketch of what the Redding's micrometer adjustable stem looks like for that particular overall length with that bullet....all the hash or tick marks and numbers.

When I switch bullets or go to a different OAL for a different gun, then I can quickly refer back to that drawing to see where I had the Redding seater die set at.

I three hole punch each form, reinforce the holes with scotch tape, then punch them again (it can get windy out at the range, and the last thing I need is a pile of papers to tear loose from the binder and go flying down the range), and then I insert the form into the 3 ring binder.

Having the Redding micrometer seating die also makes dialing in a particular OAL so much easier....I can measure the round with my digital calipers....whooooppssss! It is way too long at 1.400" and I need to be at 1.12"....so...hmmn.... okay, I need to screw it down 280 thousandths...then I start spinning it down, usually keeping count, there's 5, 10, 15, 20 thousandths....and so on.

Then when I think I have the die set in the correct spot, I will seat another bullet in a powderless/primerless case and measure again with my digital calipers. It probably took me longer for me to type this all in and for you to read it than it actually takes doing in real life.

Edited by Chills1994
Link to comment
Share on other sites

wow thats a lot! so one die can seat a 9mm bullet and a .40? and i can see how it would be easier to tighten the die down with the locking nut and then be able to turn a "dial" to the correct OAL. But i personally set my dies up on one tool head and leave them there. I think im going to have to buy one of these dang things and see how i like it!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

so one die can seat a 9mm bullet and a .40?

uhhh, no. They are caliber specific.

I got one originally so I could adjust the OAL from my 9major loads to my 9x19 sub-minor steel challenge loads. For that, it is the cats meow. I do not think it does a better job of consistently seating the bullets than the Dillon does but it is far easier to adjust.

Edited by warpspeed
Link to comment
Share on other sites

ok i guess it would help if i did a little research on it before i start asking questions huh! im to busy watching Sons of Anarchy and trying to find the cheapest place to buy a Race Master holster

Edited by cworks
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Redding Comp seating die with micrometer is a must IMO, for the handgunner who tinkers with different bullet styles from time to time (or wants to tweak different OALs on an existing load in search of optimum accuracy, or whatever)... I know I do and you can dial in the new depth crazy easy with these fine tools. And yes, the Redding absolutley will seat the bullet straighter/truer than the Dillon seating die (I've seen some obviously crookedly seated bullets randomly with the conventional style die such as Dillon's)... It's spring guided "cup" stays with the projectile (against the ogive IIRC) and keeps it alligned as you pull the handle and the case/bullet are pushed up into the die assembly... very cool design. The Dillon seating die is archaic in comparison. I can't say enough good things about the Redding.

post-34398-0-85235800-1315375007_thumb.j

Edited by okie_ipsc
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Redding Comp seating die with micrometer is a must IMO, for the handgunner who tinkers with different bullet styles from time to time (or wants to tweak different OALs on an existing load in search of optimum accuracy, or whatever)... I know I do and you can dial in the new depth crazy easy with these fine tools. And yes, the Redding absolutley will seat the bullet straighter/truer than the Dillon seating die (I've seen some obviously crookedly seated bullets randomly with the conventional style die such as Dillon's)... It's spring guided "cup" stays with the projectile (against the ogive IIRC) and keeps it alligned as you pull the handle and the case/bullet are pushed up into the die assembly... very cool design. The Dillon seating die is archaic in comparison. I can't say enough good things about the Redding.

Looks nice up there. I just bought my first open gun and I'm trying to build a load for it. I am going to order one today and see how good it is.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just bought a used one and all I have to say is DAAAANNNGG it is cool! I am now loading for my Glock using Bayou bullets and the die is set for (1).135, the first one doesn't show on the micrometer and when I switch over to load for my 2011 limited gun all I have to do is switch out my powder slide to the one adjusted for major and as long as I am using the same bullets I just turn the micrometer out to (1).200 and the rounds measure 1.201-1.202 OAL. If you change bullets like from a truncated cone to a round nose then you will not be able to use the numbers without re-adjusting the zero on the micrometer. Works great! :cheers:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

oh ok. You must have a good eye, I cant really tell if mine are canted. One thing I do notice is that on some of my .40 rounds it seems like one side of the brass is bulged out from where the bullet has been seated. you think this is from the case not being pushed all the way into my shell plate?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You might be able to see the difference with the bullet in the case, but you will certainly tell on the target with poor accuracy.

I started using the redding comp die when I started loading 147 gr MG's be cause the seating stem profile in the lee dies does not match well with the 147's.

Now I will never go back

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...