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124/125 gr versus 147 grain bullets


shotslow

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I have decision to make. Get 147 grain TC from Bear Creek (moly lead) or 125 grain RN. I ordered 3k 147 gr last year and use 6.3 grains of AA #7 to get a 136 PF. I have 124 g FMJ Zero bullets, when loaded to PF of 130, these seem to have more recoil and blast. Why does one use a 147 grain bullet over a 124 grain bullet? I am asking the question for all 9mm bullets of these weights. I use lead because of expense, but would like to know the opinion of those who can afford better or not. :sight:

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There are probably 20 threads on this subject around here. Long story short some swear by 147 and some swear by 124. 147 have a different recoil as you have noted. But some feel it is a little sluggish. The blast is probably your powder choice. 124's loaded with a nice soft cool powder like solo1000 or preferably N320 are anything but "blast" producers. And 124's are cheaper.cheers.gif

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I usually use Win231 with all semi-autos. When I got the 147 g molly bullets I started out with Win231. I had crimping problems. Even though I tightened the crimp the 147 g would slip out of the crimp from recoil. First 5 rounds would be fine, then it sounded like I forgot some of the powder. Sometimes the top round of the dropped magazine would have the bullet drop out. I tried AA #7. :closedeyes: I had got this powder to load 357 Sig. Turns out it works fine for 9mm and 147 g Bear Creek bullets. :rolleyes: I am using AA#7 to compare the two weights. I want the 125 grain bullets to win. :blink: They are cheaper.

I like AA #7. The 6.3 grains are easy to see in the case as it come around with my Hornady progressive. :surprise:

:D I don't want to think about 135 g bullets. I just get confused. :lol:

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Please enlighten me on something. How in the hell did changing powders fix your crimping issues?huh.gif Those molys should be tighter than Dicks hatband. I can't imagine them falling out of a case after loaded. You sure your setup is right?

PS overtightening crimp will actually loosen neck tension in most situations.

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I have decision to make. Get 147 grain TC from Bear Creek (moly lead) or 125 grain RN. I ordered 3k 147 gr last year and use 6.3 grains of AA #7 to get a 136 PF. I have 124 g FMJ Zero bullets, when loaded to PF of 130, these seem to have more recoil and blast. Why does one use a 147 grain bullet over a 124 grain bullet? I am asking the question for all 9mm bullets of these weights. I use lead because of expense, but would like to know the opinion of those who can afford better or not. :sight:

Neither would be my first choice in BC bullets. My current load is the BC 135g RN backed with WST. I prefer the 135 because of it's more traditional shaped ogive. Thus it can be loaded longer in my Spartan 9mm 1911 at 1.150 OAL. The 125RN in BC has a very rounded ogive, the longest I could load it to in my gun was 1.10 OAL. I love that 135g with WST in my Spartan, super soft and accurate. 4.0g at 1.150 OAL give me 1000 FPS average. This year at WA State IDPA my random loads chronoed at 1017, 1020, 1020

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I usually use Win231 with all semi-autos. When I got the 147 g molly bullets I started out with Win231. I had crimping problems. I want the 125 grain bullets to win. :blink: They are cheaper.

I use WW231 with 115, 124 and 147 grains in my Browning Hi-Power,

and MY GUN prefers the 147 grains - more accurate.

I have never noticed any change in my crimp as I've changed

powders or bullets, though???

I personally prefer the 147 grains since the recoil seems a

little nicer to ME.

You will have to try it yourself - if you like AA7 and 124's,

thats what you should use. Lots of people like the 124's.

Good luck,

Jack

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I'm really liking Bayou Bullets 147 - green molly coated bullets. Soft shooting and accurate so far but I am still testing.

I sure like the Bayou bullets, I'm running the 135gr right now in front of 4.0gr of WST. I shot a few in my Shadow but most of them have gone in my Open gun I use for steel matches. I don't like shooting minor in my open gun but after winning the match, something I had been trying to do for 3 years, I changed my mind.

I've run a lot of 125gr Bayou thru the Shadow with 4.0gr of N320 and they are very nice shooting.

I voted 147gr, based on shooting Zero 147gr JHP's, while the gun feels a bit sluggish, keep in mind I shoot Open Major, I did find that the recoil and flip was about like shooting the 22 lr top end on the gun. Albiet the sluggish feel the timer proved the split times were actually faster. I suggest that you do you testing of better by measuring something other than preception, like setting up a drill and repeating it with the time. This takes a bit of time to get consistent results but it is also good practice. Always keep in mind accuracy, it don't matter how fast you miss.

Tried a lot of powders like N320 the best. IMR7625 works well with 125gr jacketed. Clays ultra soft but accuracy suffers. WST clean and cheap, a bit snappy with jacketed bullets. TiteGroup, violent, dirty, and too hot to handle the gun.

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Thank you for the replies. I looked at several pages in this forum and tried some searches. Got nothing. :blush:

I have some 124 FMJ loaded with Tightgroup. Not my favorite for lead. I use it for cowboy shotgun. :unsure: I will load some more with Win 231. The testing is part of the fun. :blink:

I have read in several threads that the 9mm crimp should be from .376 to .376 and that is what I am using for the 124 FMJ, Hornady 125 XTD HP and 147 grain molly lead. I will re-crimp all rounds. I will find the true answer. :bow: Well, for me. :D

I did not mean to imply the changing of powder solved the bullets falling out. It was the tighter crimp.

I may have to get another powder. VV N320 sounds like one I should try.

Edited by shotslow
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I think Coco hit the nail on the head when he said to measure the differences. How things feel often has little to do with what works best. The timer is the final arbiter of what you shoot fastest.

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Helpfull thread. Im getting ready to start loading 9mm in addition to 45 and 223. I ordered a couple hundred Winchester White box each of 147 and 124 to compare before I buy bullets. Still also have to get Dillon conversion stuff as well as Lee dies.

Looks like it will N320 for powder regardless and Im not sure yet which primer.

Now if the new 5.25 would show from Springer Precision in the next week or so I can get busy.

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