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Training exercises to get "muscle explosion"?


Demetrio

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This is definitely my weakest skill. For the most I try I cannot get that necessary "explosion" to move fast from one shooting position to the next. I'm tall and a little overweight (1,84 meter, 100 Kg), which may have some influence in my "slow" moving, but I think I can move faster than I do today. :D

Just see how slow I move today:

:D

What exercises for a 52 old man do you recommend to get more "explosion" when moving from box to box?

Thanks for any ideas,

Demetrio.

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I second polymetrics.

How good are your legs sir?

I'm a shooting newbie but for my other hobbies I've been told I have good explosiveness. I'm not good enough of a shooter to see the benefits of my physical speed..but I developed mine from doing a lot of gymnastics moves.. my first martial arts school emphasized a lot of flashy useless moves :P

My secret? Huge legs. Polymetrics should be the main workout, but doing squats and deadlift will help a lot.

A lot of people think weightlifting will make you slower. That is not true. It'll make you slower if you build a lot of useless glamour muscles but core workouts will always help. You'll probably see the best short term gains from squats and deadlifts.

Jogging/Running helps a lot too, and it trims weight.

Polymetrics three times a week, short but heavy weightlfiting wession twice a week (one day squats, another day deadlifts). A bulk of your polymetrics should be focused on sprints and such.

Make sure you got someone who knows what they are doing to show you how to do squats and deadlifts, and adjust your diet to accomodate the weights.

One of my favorite workouts to keep up my footwork speed in kickboxing was to do a 1/3 of my 3-4mile runs on the balls of my feet. Calf strength is very important to building explosiveness; you'll be able to launch off of the ground much faster, almost gripping the ground you're standing on.

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How good are your legs sir?

Well, I'm not an athlete and must say I'm having sort of a sedentary lifestyle for some time now, so I guess I'm gonna have to work hard to get my legs in good condition for competition shooting. ;)

Thank you all for the tips.

Demetrio.

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Sorry, I came off rude. More specifically, I was wondering if you had any injuries or knee pain, etc. If you do, you should progress weightlifting very slowly, but you look pretty mobile in the video :)

No, I don't have any injuries or knee pain on my legs. I'm just seeing myself too slow on my moving from box to box and would like to improve that.

Like I said previously, I have been somewhat sedentary for the last two-three years, but I finally started walking some weeks ago and want to go ahead with some specific exercises for the legs to help improve my moving. ;)

Regards,

Demetrio.

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Sorry guys, if I come off as a know-it-all please point it out. I coached kickboxing while I was still at university so I'm basing my opinions on that. I am not always right and I'd appreciate any corrections or pointers that is shooting specific that I may not be aware of.

In your case, you may want to start with this very simple polymetric excercise before moving onto weights, calf excercises and such. As with any workout, preventing injury is the most important. Its great because its hard to injure yourself this way. After you feel your joints and muscles are more loosened up after walking for a few days or weeks, try this:

1. Doing it right after a walk would be great as it is a great warm up. After the walk, stretch out a little bit.

2. Very simply put, go from squatting (a** to grass) to standing. The exact form can be however you want, but pick one that puts the least strain on your knees and ankles. Start very slow for the first few reps then work your way up in speed. Its hard to tell how much you should do but if you have athletic experience from previous walks of life you can use it to determine how many to do. Once you feel your legs work good (whether that takes a session or weeks), move onto this

3. Do 3 sets of 25. If this is too easy, feel free to add sets. Start by taking few minutes of rest in between sets, but you should be able to do all your sets with only 20 seconds of break in between. Once you can do 5 sets no problem, move onto the following:

4. Here is where you start building explosiveness. You will work 20 seconds, then rest 10 seconds. That is 1 round. You will do 6 rounds, so total will be 3 minutes. When you work, you should do them as fast as possible, as much as possible. Every single set. Don't pace yourself and push push push. Record how many you did your last round. This is called the Tabata drill. You can find a timer online, or you can get a friend/spouse/etc to time you. You should set yourself a goal, but if you can't, a good goal is to be able to do 15 on your last set. Sounds easy but if you are really pushing yourself through all of the rounds, the rep count will drop very quickly so its harder than it sounds.

5. Once you reach your goal in the above exercise, its time to make things harder. Once you master this step you should start seeing improvement in your mobility, given that you supplement it with an exercise that actually causes you to change direction (wind sprints, etc.) For this step, instead of just standing up, explode up and jump with your arms in the air. Turn your head up and look at the ceiling when you do it, as if you're reaching for the sky. When you can do 50 jumps without stopping or taking too long, you're ready for the next step. Note, through all these steps you need continue your walking routine and stretch before starting your leg workouts. Many names for this excercise. Jumping squats, or monkey s*****rs, etc.

6. Okay, as you can guess, once you did step 5, its time to do the Tabata with the jumping squats. This will feel like hell. It will burn out your legs and make you limp the next day. I've never seriously done this exercise because I'm a wuss, but my record is 17 on my last set. I'd like to note I was 24 and in decent shape at the time. You should do this excercise often, but don't need to make it a super-regular thing. By this time you should be doing other things like wind sprints and other polymetric excercises recommended in this post. Remebmer, tabata rep counts don't count unless you're absolutely pushing yourself to do as much as possible.

Note: at any time, if you feel joint pain, slooooooow down. really really slow down. If pain persists then stop. Give yourself a day or two to recover before trying again. If you haven't been very physically active, you need to approach this like a rehab excercise. Take your time, you have all the time in the world to meet your goals and there is no need to rush. Feel free to repeat your previous rep count, or go below if you're feeling sick or otherwise bad. Get plenty of sleep, lots of milk, good diet. Make sure you give yourself at least one day out of the week of complete rest.

After you hit about 7-8 jumps on your last tabata, your joints and muscles in your core and leg should be good enough for weightlifting if you choose to progress that way.

Second note: right around the time you are starting tabata jumping squats, you should start doing agility excercises like wind sprints. All this muscle strength you are developing is nothing unless you put it all together through those excercises. Be careful, much like basketball (which is hell on your joints) its really easy to get injuries doing direction-changing excercises, especially if you are a tall person.

If you like this routine, may I suggest you to start a thread keeping track of your progress? Once you are satisfied with your performance, you can try jump rope (must to more than 25 mins if you want to call it a workout), running on the balls of your feet, etc.. fitness is a lifelong dedication! The whole routine should only take 5-10 minutes out of your day, not including your walk. The biggest challenge will be coming up with a routine and sticking to it.

Edited by dwkfym
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  • 3 weeks later...

I feel for you, I drive a desk all day long for the last 10 years and had to get back after it to stay competetive in 3 gun. The squats and Tabata sets above will definately get you started in the right direction, and dwkfym is right they hurt, they suck and they are hard, because like shooting there is no end to getting better, you will jsut do more, faster!

I would recommend taking a look at http://www.crossfitfootball.com/, as well, it is about building explosive athletic power, find the drills that work for you, sprints, box jumps, bear crawls, etc

to gain explosive you must be explosive so walking is a good start but it will take some sweat to get nimble, and it really takes a whole body work out and conditioning or you will end up just hurting your back or some other part so don't just focus on legs

One of my favorite, least favorite quick work outs is Tabata set (8 reps) of Burpees, start standing, go down to the ground plank out do a push up, come back to your feet and jump with hands over your head off the ground. Do as many as you can in 20 seconds, rest for 10 seconds, repeat 8 times for a total of 4 minutes, only working just over 2 1/2 minutes, push hard and see how many you can do, time is short and so is the pain. Your numbers will get better, I am 51 pushing 52 so I feel your pain, this works your legs, abs, arms,a nd certainly your breathing, let me know how it goes

jeff :cheers:

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  • 1 month later...

Having done this type of training now going on 30+ years, I would agree with just about everything being said here, but with one caveat, get yourself a good trainer, none of these exercises or drills can be done correctly without proper training on correct technique; I spent the whole of 2010 and first part of 2011 re-learning how to train before I actually was able to get into a solid training regimen; I have been working with a guy who has his Masters in Physical Therapy & Minor in Kinesiology and will not train with anyone else, due to the fact that I am 51 yrs old but I can tell you I am in the best shape of my life right now and have recovered from a lot of over-training injuries developed over years of improper training via the military by training with this guy.

This is definitely my weakest skill. For the most I try I cannot get that necessary "explosion" to move fast from one shooting position to the next. I'm tall and a little overweight (1,84 meter, 100 Kg), which may have some influence in my "slow" moving, but I think I can move faster than I do today. :D

Just see how slow I move today:

:D

What exercises for a 52 old man do you recommend to get more "explosion" when moving from box to box?

Thanks for any ideas,

Demetrio.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Easiest way to become an explosive mover is to do your leg exercises explosively. I know it sounds tautological but getting explosiveness requires practicing being explosive. When you do your squats, explode up from the ground. When you do lunges, explode into the next lunge. And so on. Like anything else, you have to train your muscles to move that way.

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Howdy,

First, a big resounding 'NO' on the plyometrics, at least not until you have had a proper fitness evaluation by a trained and educated fitness pro and are working with them to "get you ready" to do plyometrics; just like Cross-Fit you MUST be at a solid level of fitness & flexibility before you attempt to do Plyometircs; I am 51, just recently was a member of the US National Team- Senior STD Div. and shot the World Shoot XVI in Greece; I spent over 18 months "getting Ready" for the match, with both fitness and flexibility training & coaching and also lots of shooting skill sets work and lots of matches over a much longer period of time.

I would suggest you reference my recent post on the forum concerning Cross-Fit Training and my background; I can tell you that solid power yoga, any good "functional" flexibility and "functional" strength training will help you tremendously, along with any aerobic exercise done in interval style, with bursts of speed combined with cruising or for me, spinning on my mtn. bike; It took me a solid year (and I am not a slouch) to be "ready" to do any type of training remotely close to plyometrics or Cross-Fit, I have since, under direct supervision of a correctly certified & educated Professional Trainer/Physical Therapist been able to incorporate certain exercises from plyometrics but only certain ones because all of them are no always good for some individuals, thats why you need a good fitness eval beforehand and MUST work with a fitness pro as mentioned earlier; a good pro will keep you from doing things that get you laid up from injury and not being able to shoot, which should be our ultimate goal, to shoot the stage better, because we can move better. There are of course, lots of other factors involved in shooting better but for guys our age- moving clean, smooth and ultimately faster is a big deal.

Check out "Safe Fitness Solutions" website, they are located in St. Louis, MO. I'm sure if you call and ask for James Harris (he is my trainer) and ask him for a referral, he can help you find someone close to you by telling you the right questions to ask when you talk to a pro about functional fitness training.

This is definitely my weakest skill. For the most I try I cannot get that necessary "explosion" to move fast from one shooting position to the next. I'm tall and a little overweight (1,84 meter, 100 Kg), which may have some influence in my "slow" moving, but I think I can move faster than I do today. :D

Just see how slow I move today:

:D

What exercises for a 52 old man do you recommend to get more "explosion" when moving from box to box?

Thanks for any ideas,

Demetrio.

Edited by MQW
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  • 2 years later...

Plyometric exercises are very effective and require hardly any to no equipment. Other than that any kind of high speed resistance training movements like power cleans or snatches. Keep in mind high speed is the key, these do not need to be performed heavy, nor will doing so be effective in developing speed when it comes to manipulating the bodyweight. They should be performed at around 70% of the 1RM (one repetition max) if speed of movement is the goal.

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