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Get The Lead Out


johnny1gun

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I am borrowing a friends gun,and his ammo.It is a 1911 Taurus .45 cal.I can not get the lead streaks out of the barrel.I have used Shooters Choice lead remover several times,and Hopps lead remover.Nothing is working.Never had this problem befor.Thought about shooting some jacketed bullets through it then cleaning it,but I dont know.Need it for Saturday shoot.Any ideas?

Thanks,J.B.

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Get some original Chore Boys, the brass ones (use magnet to make sure they are brass - magnet wont attract brass), cut it into strips and wrap around an old bore brush. Should have it cleaned up pretty quickly.

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You can ruin a barrel cleaning it. Best results for me is soak it in Kroil for at least at day, then brush with a nylon brush. If it's still there don't worry about it or as John mentioned shoot a few jacketed bullets through it.

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I thought shooting copper through a leaded barrel was bad? Don't know why. I was also cautioned that you shouldn't go back and forth, but never got a good explanation as to why. Anyone know the answer or is that info bunk?

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I thought shooting copper through a leaded barrel was bad? Don't know why. I was also cautioned that you shouldn't go back and forth, but never got a good explanation as to why. Anyone know the answer or is that info bunk?

Did you read it on the internet?

Edited by Loves2Shoot
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Shooting a copper bullet into a leaded barrel can cause increased pressure, but I seriously doubt there will be a problem unless it's severe.

Brownells sells a lead puller that supposedly works pretty well.

personally, I'd just leave it.

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The theory, or so I have heard, is that you shouldn't shoot copper then lead, not that you shouldn't shoot lead then copper. Actually the idea of "shooting a jacketed bullet down the bore to clean out lead" is commonplace. The reason you supposedly shouldn't shoot copper then lead is that a jacketed bullet leaves a rough copper coating on the interior of the bore, then when you fire a lead bullet thereafter you get really heavy leading because the rough copper strips lead all the way down the bore. Don't know how true that is, that's just what I was told.

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Brownells sells the Lewis Lead Remover kit, basically a rod with a rubber tip and a small brass screen. Works great on heavily leaded barrels. I use the Brownells Doubletuff bore brushes which are basically thick bronze bore brushes. Just need a few passes with whatever cleaner I have on hand to get out the moly gunk.

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The theory, or so I have heard, is that you shouldn't shoot copper then lead, not that you shouldn't shoot lead then copper. Actually the idea of "shooting a jacketed bullet down the bore to clean out lead" is commonplace. The reason you supposedly shouldn't shoot copper then lead is that a jacketed bullet leaves a rough copper coating on the interior of the bore, then when you fire a lead bullet thereafter you get really heavy leading because the rough copper strips lead all the way down the bore. Don't know how true that is, that's just what I was told.

This sounds familiar and makes sense. Thanks.

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Since it is a borrowed gun first step is to contact the owner and ask him/her what you should do.

My method is to wrap a piece of copper chore boy around a cleaning brush, this cuts the lead out. The final touch is a little jb bore paste on a patch.

I learned my lesson on chemicals, the puroxide and vinegar, that stuff will get it out but it will also start pitting a stainless steel barrel in 20 minutes.

Edited by CocoBolo
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sorry to be the dissenting voice, but shooting a jacketed bullet through a leaded barrel only removes some of the lead. A portion of it could, and often does get "ironed" into the bore. I have seen this proven over and over when using my Foul-Out. I have also seen barrels that were rusting under heavy fouling, this is the funny looking red bubbles some guys occasionally see when using a Foul-Out. Perhaps the worst bore I ever saw was in a used 686 I picked up many years ago. The bore looked spotless and shiney. However, my range rod wouldn't enter the barrel at all. I was wondering if I had a factory defective barrel that was way too small. All the lands & grooves looked perfect!. I pulled out my old-school Lewis Lead Remover and tried running it through the barrel. It got stuck part way in. I hammered it out and looked at the bore again. Finally I realized I was dealing with the mother of all leading, and went out & bought a Foul-Out. After several days, and several solution changes, it came clean. I still have the revolver, and the Foul-Out. Neither is for sale at any price.

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Why do you care that there are lead streaks in the barrel? Are they interfering with reliability? Are they interfering with accuracy?

It is a friends gun ,and would like to give it back to him cleaner than I got it.Are lead streaks no big deal.Thought it would just keep building on its self if I keep shooting it that way.I dont think its real bad but I have a IDPA match then a classifier to shoot I want it to be easier to clean after words.Some say to run oil in it with a patch after cleaning. Does this really help with the leading.Thanks for all the info.Never not been able to get the lead out of my guns.
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