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Glock 35 & Glock 34 lower units


SAMMY63

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I am wonder if the lower unit of the Glock 35 and the Glock 34 are compatable. will i be able to put the inner works from the 35 into the 34.

I am wondering this from a safety standpoint, and thought i would ask before i did something stupid.

this is what happens when you let a friend borrow a gun.

thanks for the help guys.

good shooting

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The frames are the same. The only difference is the ejector, on the .40 the ejector is straight, and on the 9mm it has a slight bend. If you are swapping all the internal parts it won't be an issue though. Just make sure you have the right ejector for shooting .40 cal.

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CJ1 is correct. The newer frames are the same and so are the internals, except the ejector. The exception is some of the earlier 3rd Gen G34 frames were 2 pin models as opposed to the G35 having 3 pins.

Edited by prreed10
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It looks like, up to that point, they were all different - one for the 17 and the 22, one for the 20/21. I guess streamlining the parts or the 3 gen frames is the reason for the change. I really don't know.

Several years back, I picked up a used 3rd gen G34 and when it arrived, it was a 2 pin. It sparked my curiosity, especially when trying to find a slide stop, which also differs between the 2 and 3 pin models.

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As above, with one addendum.

If you shoot Production Division in USPSA, you cannot use the receiver of one model with the upper of another without falling afoul of the rules. It earns you a move to Open Division, and shooting ten round uncompensated iron sighted minor in Open kinda sucks.

Yes, with the internals swapped out only somebody with an intimate knowledge of Glock's serial number sequences will know. You'd have to shout it out in front of match officials that you had a multimodel Frankenstein gun for anybody to assume anything but that you had switched top ends on two identical models, but it's worth knowing the rules if you ever go to a major match.

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It's not hard at all to tell if a Glock has had its frame switched. A Glock has its serial number marked in three places: on the slide, barrel hood, and frame. If the frame serial number doesn't match the slide and barrel serial numbers...

However, that only applies if a person has switched the entire frame. As Kevin says, if they've only switched internals but retained the same frame it's highly unlikely to be caught. In that instance it just comes down to the person's integrity to not do anything illegal, natch.

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When Glock replaces a frame for defect, do they reissue the same SN or replace?

The breachface on my newest Glock model 17 cracked. Fortunately, the entire slide was replaced within a three week period. So, the serial number is now different than the serial number on my frame.

But it's all good...everything is in tip-top condition again B)

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As above, with one addendum.

If you shoot Production Division in USPSA, you cannot use the receiver of one model with the upper of another without falling afoul of the rules. It earns you a move to Open Division, and shooting ten round uncompensated iron sighted minor in Open kinda sucks.

This rule is just plain ridiculous, I had a slide replaced by glock so now according to this rule my gun puts me in open, it isn't like I have some unfair advantage.

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Interesting. Thanks, Ryan.

Just out of curiosity, was that different pre-2002?

There's a big difference between the two pin and three pin locking blocks in the G34. The three pin extends farther to the front, and looks like it changes where the slide experiences the stress at the rear end of its travel....

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The locking blocks are the same between 9 and .40?

From the look of the part #'s, the post 2002 G17, G20, G21, G21SF, G22, G24, G34 & G35 all use the same one.

Also something to consider is the Gen2 G22 I purchased as a LE tradein will not work with a newer G24 as the trigger does not reset.

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This rule is just plain ridiculous, I had a slide replaced by glock so now according to this rule my gun puts me in open, it isn't like I have some unfair advantage.

You should have paperwork from Glock showing that they replaced your slide on that frame, therefore it's a perfectly legal combo.

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There's a big difference between the two pin and three pin locking blocks in the G34. The three pin extends farther to the front, and looks like it changes where the slide experiences the stress at the rear end of its travel....

So are you saying that "the same locking block for 9 and .40" was a change that happened concurrently with the switch from two to three pin? IOW if it's a two pin it's different locking blocks, if it's three pin it's the same locking block?

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So are you saying that "the same locking block for 9 and .40" was a change that happened concurrently with the switch from two to three pin? IOW if it's a two pin it's different locking blocks, if it's three pin it's the same locking block?

On three pin Glocks all that matters is the frame size.

However the 17 size and the 20/21 size are the same

Then the 19-23 size and so on

Caliber and even if it is the SF does not matter on the locking block

Mostly true on the 2 pin as well. 17/22 same, 19/23 same, 20/21 same and so on.

I don't ever remember like the 17/22 being different blocks.

Only real thing they changed is now the 17 and 20 share the block.

Edited by Bill_J
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This rule is just plain ridiculous, I had a slide replaced by glock so now according to this rule my gun puts me in open, it isn't like I have some unfair advantage.

You should have paperwork from Glock showing that they replaced your slide on that frame, therefore it's a perfectly legal combo.

This is an interesting topic. After reviewing the 2008 USPSA rule book, I can't locate any specific information on slide and frame serial number matching in the Production Division.

Production Division: Appendix 4, 21.3 does allow after market slides on production pistols. They have to be the same length, contour and caliber. Not sure how those slides would be any different than another slide from the same firearm company.

However, I'll keep looking through the rule book...

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This rule is just plain ridiculous, I had a slide replaced by glock so now according to this rule my gun puts me in open, it isn't like I have some unfair advantage.

You should have paperwork from Glock showing that they replaced your slide on that frame, therefore it's a perfectly legal combo.

This is an interesting topic. After reviewing the 2008 USPSA rule book, I can't locate any specific information on slide and frame serial number matching in the Production Division.

Production Division: Appendix 4, 21.3 does allow after market slides on production pistols. They have to be the same length, contour and caliber. Not sure how those slides would be any different than another slide from the same firearm company.

However, I'll keep looking through the rule book...

The op. was discussing changing the slide and caliber.

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As above, with one addendum.

If you shoot Production Division in USPSA, you cannot use the receiver of one model with the upper of another without falling afoul of the rules. It earns you a move to Open Division, and shooting ten round uncompensated iron sighted minor in Open kinda sucks.

This rule is just plain ridiculous, I had a slide replaced by glock so now according to this rule my gun puts me in open, it isn't like I have some unfair advantage.

I don't think if the factory does it your against the rules. No proof of that other then the factory is "fixing" it not "modifying" it. I am pretty sure the factory keeps a record of the serial numbers and it would still be considered a factory issued gun. Not a Frankenstein.

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Sorry, a clarification is in order:

If you take the top end, or just the slide or barrel, of a G34 and put it on the frame of another G34, you're fine (so no rules violations on repairs with different serial numbers).

It's when you take take the slide or barrel of a different model gun, even of the same caliber, and put that together with a receiver from a model different from the top end parts, essentially changing the receiver into the model that the top end parts came from, that you are in violation. So you can't put a G34 top end on the lower of a G17 or one of the 40 cal models.

I think serializing the barrel and slide is unique to Glock. Because repairs are common, I doubt that a match official will "challenge" the competitor to prove that the different serial numbered parts of his Production Gwhatever are all from the same model, though I suppose it is technically possible (and it would come down to the word of the competitor vs. a check of some master list of Glock model serial #'s, and I don't think anyone is willing to do that).

FWIW I agree the rule goes overboard. There is no difference, save for easily swapped out small parts, in the same late generation small frame recievers of the G17/22/34/35, and there is zero competitve advantage.

Still, them's the rules, and that's what I wanted to point out.

Edited by kevin c
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