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Faster Trigger Finger?

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Actually, I like practicing the trigger reset mode. I find when I need to make a series of long precision shots, feeling the trigger reset and then breaking the shot has helped my accuracy. Additionally, I became more of aware of my finger, trigger, and sear engagment by practicing while watching TV.

I am not saying the trigger reset mode is a panacea but what it did was make me more aware of everything. By holding the trigger back, I really noticed my sights returning. I noticed exactly when my shot broke and where my sights were when the shot broke.

It was just one tool in the toolbox, that helped me progress. Maybe it was because I was focusing on the feeling and hearing the reset, that subconciously I became more attuned to everything--sort of seeing without trying to see. I became more aware without fixating on trying to become more aware.

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Also, you can look at your trigger itself. I shoot a 1911 and went from a medium curved trigger pad to a long flat trigger pad and I went from .25 split to a. 15 split. Now I don't even think trigger speed, I thing about shot calling all the time. What's the point of ripping off 5 rounds a second if they're not all alphas? :cheers:

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Is it possible to get off the second shot before the gun has moved off target? Center the dot and tap 2x with just the first sight of the dot? Or must the gun recoil first, then regain the dot before the second. Sometimes it feels as though I am accomplishing the former when I use one piece of tape for the 2 holes and I never refound the dot for the second tap.

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Is it possible to get off the second shot before the gun has moved off target? Center the dot and tap 2x with just the first sight of the dot? Or must the gun recoil first, then regain the dot before the second. Sometimes it feels as though I am accomplishing the former when I use one piece of tape for the 2 holes and I never refound the dot for the second tap.

No, it is not possible. The gun will recoil between the shots.

I'll suggest you'd be best served by losing the word "tap" from your shooting vocabulary.

Strive to see...constantly.

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G-ManBart> I realize that its virtually impossible to row your finger back only far enough to rest the trigger while shooting quickly (sub .15 splits). My point was that when most people "Try" to shoot fast they mash a 2lb trigger with 10lbs of force then row their finger back far enough to almost come out of the trigger guard. THIS is why they can't shoot fast consistently. Excess in both directions slows every thing down. Even if a shooter worked at only mashing the trigger with 5lbs of force and pulling their finger back off the trigger a few millimeters this would produce a SIGNIFICANT increase in trigger manipulation speed. Reducing the excess in either direction allows you to do everything sooner. Sooner = faster. The only way I am able to produce sub .10 sec splits is by focusing on doing everything sooner by NOT rowing my finger excessively in either direction.

Thanks, Cha-lee, never really thought about splits this way. How do you think one could incorporate this into dryfire practice?

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You really don't want to practice that. I've seen the actual evidence, based on some of the best shooters in the world, and it's a dead end for all but the smallest percentage of people (which maybe CHA-LEE falls into). I'm sure this is why so few of the very best have ridiculously fast splits. You'll hear a lot of middle classification shooters talk about how it helped them, not so much from the best. If somebody wants to be the best local B, who shoots blazing fast splits, this is a great way to do it. :P

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I agree, When I took a class with TJ, he said that more than likely many of us could shoot just as fast if not faster than him, but he was killing us everywhere else. We worked on the "everywhere else"

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It all depends on where your splits are in comparison to your competition. If you are doing .50 splits and others are doing .25's then you have something that needs to be worked on to improve your overall times. If on the other hand you are pulling .18 splits and others are getting .13's...well there's not enough of a gain to be worried about. I'd look to transitions, movement etc. for a bigger gain on stages and just plain work on a clean trigger release to get your points.

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G-ManBart> I realize that its virtually impossible to row your finger back only far enough to rest the trigger while shooting quickly (sub .15 splits). My point was that when most people "Try" to shoot fast they mash a 2lb trigger with 10lbs of force then row their finger back far enough to almost come out of the trigger guard. THIS is why they can't shoot fast consistently. Excess in both directions slows every thing down. Even if a shooter worked at only mashing the trigger with 5lbs of force and pulling their finger back off the trigger a few millimeters this would produce a SIGNIFICANT increase in trigger manipulation speed. Reducing the excess in either direction allows you to do everything sooner. Sooner = faster. The only way I am able to produce sub .10 sec splits is by focusing on doing everything sooner by NOT rowing my finger excessively in either direction.

Thanks, Cha-lee, never really thought about splits this way. How do you think one could incorporate this into dryfire practice?

I never practiced dry firing more than one shot at a time.

be

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I may be one of the only 1% that is held back by a slow not fast trigger finger. I will have the sights on target waiting for the gun to fire . and finally getting bored and look to the next target before the gun fires the second shot.

And I practice plenty , in fact my transition time is very close to my split times.

it it the #1 source of my shooting frustration in my training

I had to play that stupid -stupid mouse click game 8 times to get one score at 30

Edited by AlamoShooter

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Relax, and see and feel more.

be

enough said . IMHO

Coming from a guy who can rip off maybe the fastest splits I've ever seen....that says something!

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To improve your speed or accuracy follow these tips:

 

Right Grip

Dry Firing” is an excellent way to practice
Adust your Stock

try to feather your trigger instead of making distinct hits
And also Practice makes Perfect.

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Posted (edited)

Disregard.  

Edited by nutzach

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I think relaxing is a big part of being fast.

 

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Bill drills...  this will help with recoil management and getting back on target.  You can only shoot as fast as you see your sights.

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Speed Loss, of any kind in shooting, is more of a mental issue.  It's the hesitation of not calling the shot, waiting for the buzzer,  2nd guessing yourself.

Condition yourself to listen for the beginning tone of the buzzer.

Practice until you can't miss when you see the needed sight picture.

Know what sight picture is required to make the shot.

Put it all together and once the shot is done move on to the next.

There are so many methods and techniques that work.  But those only build on the basics. They may take you over the hump to GM, but first build the basics.

Remember the Duke in "The Shootist" 

"...I found out early that most men, regardless of cause or need, aren't willing. They blink an eye or draw a breath before they pull the trigger. I won't."

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A lot of pulling the trigger faster has to with how quickly you get off the trigger. Most people tend to pin the trigger to the rear far too long. As soon as a shot breaks you should be resetting and prepping for the next pull.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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