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cali shot doc

Quit a stage?

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I havent quit.

I once realized that I didn't have enough ammo to finish a match. I was asking around to see if anyone had some extra .40 I could buy from them. A friend said he had some reloads that wouldn't feed in his gun (wrong OAL or something) and said that if my gun would feed them, I could have them, "Please, use 'em up." He just wanted his brass back.

I said, "This gun will feed anything."

Well, it didn't feed that stuff too well. I had to manually cycle every 3rd or 4th round, but I finished the match.

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I considered it once, I had gun problems while engaging an array one handed while holding a roped trap door open. I got a " finger!" warning and being a new shooter I was nervous and flustered, I about said screw it. I sucked it up and finished. My time was deplorable but I shot mostly a's!

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Revolver sight apparently got out of whack, and 6" round plates at 30 yds weren't getting hit. Went through a moonclip, couldn't see how the bullets were missing or where they were going, so I left the plates standing. Discretion is the better part of valor.

IMHO, the game is to get the best hit factor possible under the conditions you are have to shoot in. Leaving a plate now an then is better, re score, than sending more lead downrange and STILL not hitting the target.

Edited by professor

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Screw on rear sight came off at a star, lol talk about point shooting. I didnt quit, but took 20 rounds on what I usually do in 5 or 6.

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Eotech + 20mph wind + 55gr + 500yds = Quit

I'm sure i could have finished had I had enough ammo. But after 1 mag and knowing that I still had 4 more stages to shoot, I said "I'll leave this one to Range Gods."

Fired some shots and made sure the R.O knew I had engaged the target then took my FTN. 30 seconds v.s. what could have been all day. OR my next round could have dropped it. You just never know.

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Ya had gun problems and just said the heck with it when the gun wasnt feeding at all. Wasn't worth the agrivation to continue shooting it

Edited by EkuJustice

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Yesterday I just quit the match with 4 out of 8 stages shot.

I just reinstaled a 40-9mm barrel in my Glock

everything ran perfect at our local 3 gun club match

at the Southwest pistol leage charity match my glock went into bolt action mode.

after the first two stages it was running great

the third stage it started to fail to reset the trigger.

on the fourth stage I stopped half way through and unloaded and showed clear.

I fiddled with it on an empty bay and tryed to shoot one more stage. . . it failed misserably.

I just quit the match. look I would have gladlly given the $40.00 match fee for fund raising purposes to the club . . . I just didn't want the stress of a 38 round course of fire to be shot by racking the slidde after every shot. . . and then going back and picking up 38 rounds out of the dirt.

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In about my 3rd match there was a Polish Plate Rack. I was with a bunch of great shooters in a squad of 12. As nice as everyone was, I felt a good bit of pressure when that thing started spinning like a crzed Ferris Wheel. I decided there and then that I would finish it or run out of ammo - there would be no quit. I was just glad I didn't have to pick up any rocks to get that last plate (though the thought did occur to me!).

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In my very first match, I was up against a plate rack and ran out of ammo. That was definitely a lesson learned.

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As others have said not with working equipment and enough ammo. I did retire from a match when my 1911 sheared off the barrel lugs and the barrel wound up on top of the magazine. Did take all the ammo with me to finish my first star but persistence got the last plate. <_<

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I quit one stage earlier this year after my 5th jam on the first stage. I decided I'd rather stop and try and figure out what was wrong than to take a chance that something worse would happen. I found the problem and fixed it and was fine for the rest of the match.

There is only one time when I even considered quitting in disgust and I know some people who would tell me that I should have. It was back when I was first getting started in Production on a classifier that was a simple Virginia count (shoot one shot on each target, reload and repeat). I drew and immediately shot two shots on the first target.

I mentally kicked myself an was so rattled that I missed the third target completely. At that point I knew that I would be better off with a 0 score than to have something really low that would screw with my initial classification, but I shot on anyway and ended up with something really bad which did, in fact, screw with my initial classification. That was also the beginning of my true dislike for classifiers - they always screw with my head and I never shoot them as well as the other stages in a match.

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In my very first match, I was up against a plate rack and ran out of ammo. That was definitely a lesson learned.

Even shooting open I carry more ammo than I think I may need. One big stick and two small ones plus a barney round for a total of up to 74 rounds. I have two more mag pouches on my belt *one is used for the barney mag* just in case I think I might get into trouble on a stage. If it looks BAD I can load up with four big sticks at 29 rounds each, one or two more little sticks at 22 rounds and a barney mag for a total of 139 to 161 rounds on my belt and in the gun. There are just some days when you can't have enough ammo. ROFL :wacko:

Joe W.

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I barely bring that much to a match.

I think my pants would fall off if I had that much on my belt.

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KS section match.

Stage with thirty-something pieces of steel.

Shooter comment, "I've got 57 rounds, that should be enough..." :rolleyes:

:surprise:

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I barely bring that much to a match.

I think my pants would fall off if I had that much on my belt.

2010 USPSA Open/Production Nationals, 14 round stage, one 29 round big stick and two 22 round smaller mags. You just never know when one mag will tank on you mid-stage.

KS section match.

Stage with thirty-something pieces of steel.

Shooter comment, "I've got 57 rounds, that should be enough..." :rolleyes:

:surprise:

32 pieces of steel. I helped RO that stage and I can't tell you how many shooters ran out of ammo before they got to the end of the stage. :cheers:

Joe W.

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In August at a local match I hit an 8" plate that turned sideways. The range was about 12 yards or so, and and all I could see of the plate was the edge. This stage was off hand only, and sometime during this CF My grip lossened and I began to experience FTF's. I hit the edge of the plate five or six times according to my friend that was the RO. I fianally went on and got all of the other targets, and then went back and shot four more times, before knocking the sideways plate down. After the stage the consensus was that I should have gone on because the penalty would have hurt way sorse than the extra time. I'm not sure that I amcapable of quitting in the middle as long as I had bullets and the pistol still worked. It may have been smarter, but in my mind I still had a "bad guy" up in front of me, so I continued until it was down.

4.3.1.6

Unlike Poppers, metal plates are not subject to calibration or calibration

challenges. If a scoring metal plate has been hit but fails

to fall or overturn, the Range Officer shall declare range equipment

failure and order the competitor to reshoot the course of

fire, after the faulty plate has been rectified.

Should have had a reshoot due to REF.

Thank you. Saved me from digging out the "Book"

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If by quitting you mean going home? no. 

If you mean having to give up on a stage without completing it? Yes. Mostly due to something breaking. But I came withing two rounds of doing it when new. It was a texas star, and I had figured out how much ammo i could spare for it and still shoot the rest of the match with some margin.  I learned to bring more ammo though. 

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As the proverbial new guy, I cannot say I have any experience since I haven't shot a match yet. I have shot competitive Trap for 15 yrs and have seen shooters walk off the field part way through an event.. For serious competitors (not necessarily top competitors but shooters that drive themselves to win) failing in competition after loads of practicing can be really mess with your head. You stand there asking yourself "what I am doing wrong??? - I shot so well in practice..!"

Nothing is harder for me as a shooter to than to step out on the field, promptly drop 4 targets out the gate and continue to shoot the remaining 196 knowing that it will take at least a 199 to win!!! I have never lost my lunch on the field but I've sure thought about it before....LOL

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I am relatively new to USPSA, and so far, I haven't ever quit a stage. There were a few times that it was pretty ugly and I probably should have, but it just isn't in me to not fight through it. I always figured I would kick myself far less to end up with a crappy time and score than I would if I gave up. There were a couple of times that I got to a star at the end and ran out of ammo before I got them all knocked off though.

David S.

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I have never quit a stage, except for a couple of squibs that forced me to quit.

I have seen a shooter loose his mag retainer/release and use the week hand to hold the mag in the gun to complete the stage. Once watched a fellow shooter stop for a perceived squib, borrow the RO's pen to verify that the barrel was clear and ask the RO if he could continue, before putting 3min+ on a 20 sec stage.

Once shot a course that was questionable at best. Plates on a rack didn't disappear, but didn't leave enough to warrant using up too much ammo on it. After a few shooters, everyone realized that it was best, scorewise, just to leave whatever plates you didn't get on the fly-by and kill the clock early.

This past weekend, had to clear a shooter who's gun wouldn't cycle because the lug on the barrel had sheared off.

There ARE situations when quitting a course of fire is the best option.

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I have never quit a stage, except for a couple of squibs that forced me to quit.

I have seen a shooter loose his mag retainer/release and use the week hand to hold the mag in the gun to complete the stage. Once watched a fellow shooter stop for a perceived squib, borrow the RO's pen to verify that the barrel was clear and ask the RO if he could continue, before putting 3min+ on a 20 sec stage.

Once shot a course that was questionable at best. Plates on a rack didn't disappear, but didn't leave enough to warrant using up too much ammo on it. After a few shooters, everyone realized that it was best, scorewise, just to leave whatever plates you didn't get on the fly-by and kill the clock early.

This past weekend, had to clear a shooter who's gun wouldn't cycle because the lug on the barrel had sheared off.

There ARE situations when quitting a course of fire is the best option.

I have done that...Many years ago, in a pin match, shooting a 45 ACP...SUCKS!

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In production I have three double mag pouches and one in the mag pocket of my tactical pants so not much worry of running out. Always have several boxes in my car as well so in pretty good shape plus additional 9 mm for someone who did run out. Other than DQ nothing early and gun has not broked during that time,but that is usually the only reason I have seen people stop. Couple of exceptions with hotheads but we don't count them anyway and are glad they left. Very few of those folks though - shooters are usually pretty good people.

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If it looks BAD I can load up with four big sticks at 29 rounds each, one or two more little sticks at 22 rounds and a barney mag for a total of 139 to 161 rounds on my belt and in the gun. There are just some days when you can't have enough ammo. ROFL :wacko:
I barely bring that much to a match.

My last match, I only took 135 rounds to the match. (I knew that the minimum round count at this club usually runs 105-120.)

Buying more was not an option; I was too broke. It was either go to the match with 135 or don't go to the match.

I came home with 27 rounds.

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