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IDescribe

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About IDescribe

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    Space Ghost from Space Coast

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    Spacecoast of FL
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    Matthew

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  1. IDescribe

    Preferred 9mm plated bullet?

    Nate, now that I see you are using a comp, I'd recommend JHP. Same price for 124gr JHP from Precision Delta. That's your go-to for non-leading, precision jacketed 9mm loading at a beautifully reasonable price. FMJ won't do it horribly -- plenty of people shoot FMJ with comps, but it will build up slowly over time, and Titegroup is not the powder to use. It will be dirty at all but max or +P loads. It also isn't the best for coated lead, and SNS are sometimes a little undersized, so you really had a bad combination of powder and bullet for a comp.
  2. IDescribe

    Preferred 9mm plated bullet?

    I'm anti-compensator, and people have caught onto my under-sized coated lead and Titegroup sabotage strategy, so I'm trying open-based FMJ now. Seriously, though, he didn't mention a compensator in the original post, so I wasn't thinking compensator. He just said PCC. Normally, I'd recommend JHP for just about anything, but he had specified RN, and I know some PCCs have feeding issues with JHP, so I didn't push in that direction. If he'd specified a comp, I'd have gone the CMJ route, OR pushed for JHP. As a pure group, I wouldn't say it's great. HOWEVER, if that were a cluster of five with three randomly distributed flyers, I'd it's unclear if the weakness is in the bullet or the shooter, but with those 3 below the main group of 5 being right on top of each other, it makes me think you changed something every so slightly, the hold or something. I'd say that that target represents a tight load with the shift in POI sitting with shooter. And I don't think bad on the shooter's end, just some subtle shift to grip or hold or stance or something happened between those two groups. I guess it is possible that you dropped the nose, but that's some awfully precise muzzle drop to put those bullets on top of each other. So the target represents a tight load. I can get that group out of coated lead or jacketed. With plated, it's a crap shoot, and I've loaded a wide variety. There has been one that has performed with the precision I wanted, and it was more expensive and outclassed by other bullets. I do not know about Everglades plated bullets. I have always been under the impression that Everglades buys the bullets they sell from other companies. I know for sure that they did/do that with some bullets -- some from RMR, for example, and sold them without labeling them RMR, and I have thought they did that with all (though obviously could be wrong on the 'all' part). Right now, the 124gr plated RN (ftr - out of stock, no stated estimate on availability) they describe the bullet as "These are new plated bullets. 1200 fps max recommended velocity. Made in the USA." That doesn't sound to me like a bullet they are manufacturing. I don't know why a company wouldn't make it clear they are producing the bullets. So one of my questions would be WHERE they are sourcing that bullet, then whether or not I'd be better buying it from that company directly. And whether or not I can count on that bullet continuing to be available. The idea the that there are better plated bullets out there is intriguing to me. Speer Gold Dots are plated, and they rock, but the plating is tons thicker than the plating with what we think of when talk about "plated bullets". So I know good plated bullets CAN be made. I just haven't found them in the price range I can get good lead or jacketed for. Maybe I will try Everglades. I am open to new things.
  3. IDescribe

    Preferred 9mm plated bullet?

    A question like this gets a sound off -- "I use ___________________" It will produce the same list of choices you're already looking at. So when you are done, your choices are going to be Berry's, Ranier, Xtreme, and RMR. Same list you started with. You will not get performance as good as you will from FMJ, and you can get Precision Delta 124gr FMJ-RN for 8.9 cents per bullet shipped when you buy 2000 or more. Just get FMJ.
  4. IDescribe

    New Eggleston Munitions 147gr flat point

    Correct. I have two loads where Load A grouped better at 15 than Load B, but Load B grouped better at 25 because Load A was falling apart at 25 yards. You want to start accuracy testing close enough that your eyes aren't mucking up the test, but far enough away that you can truly see the diff between loads. BUT you want to finish accuracy testinf at the max distance you will shoot the load.
  5. IDescribe

    Montana Gold vs Precision Delta

    I was thinking of softer jacket but said softer bullet. The MG jacket is indeed harder metal.
  6. IDescribe

    Montana Gold vs Precision Delta

    With N320 and 124gr MG JHP, a difference in OAL of .02 was about the same as the difference on .1gr of powder in terms of velocity in a test I conducted across a range of 0.100 for OAL. I have not tested other bullets and powders across that wide a range, but with faster burning powders at 9mm minor velocities, that has been a reliable predictor for other powders and bullets. As to the specific question, I have data for the MG 124gr JHP vs the PD 124gr JHP with only two powders. With N320, the PD was about 30 feet/sec faster. With Titegroup, it was 10. Softer bullets obturate better and seal in more gas. It makes sense to me that PD would be faster than MG, with MG being a harder bullet.
  7. IDescribe

    EGW chamber checker question

    And the EGW gauge is not the most precise. It is the tightest. People tend to confuse tight with precision when it comes to case gauges. The more cartridges it rejects, the better a job people think that it is doing. But the opposite is true. The more cartridges it rejects that work just fine in the barrel, the worse a job the case gauge is doing, the less precise it is relative to THAT barrel. There are boatloads of us out here who don't use case gauges at all, and never have cartridges fail for being dimensionally out of spec. It isn't hard to do.
  8. IDescribe

    Glock 34 Double Diamond Barrel OAL issue?

    The P09/P07 are so hardened. Probably the P10 barrel, as well.
  9. IDescribe

    Hodgdon Titegroup vs VV N320 for 9mm

    Can't say I disagree with anything you said there. And that is what I was doing - - offering food for thought. It is more often than others HP38/231, N320, and TG pitted against each other for 9mm minor. Of those three, N320 is best. I dont think particularly highly of the other two. But there are lots of good powders for that application.
  10. IDescribe

    Glock 34 Double Diamond Barrel OAL issue?

    Yeah, most folks recommend you do what they do, and all they did was what someone else told them to. Okay, so many years ago, a handy fella at ar15.com was unhappy with his Dillon 650 OAL consistency and went through a lot of analysis and conversations with techs at Dillon and figured out a way to secure the shellplate on a 650 to improve OAL. This involved a wide washer or two below the shellplate to tighten things up and make it more stable. He did some other stuff, too, but the washer was 95% of the improvement. It's a good modification to make -- to a 650. Now there are videos all of the internet of people recommending the same thing with a Hornady LnL, but the LnL is not the same design. I no longer have an LnL (long, tragic story), so I can't duplicate what you have done to assess it specifically in this moment. I see no problem with a split washer on top of the shellplate. HOWEVER, do not put anything below the shellplate. On a Dillon 650, the case rims are held by the shellplate, and when it is driven into the dies, the shellplate receives that force, and flexes and tilts JUST a little, a hair. But this is not the case with an LnL. On an LnL, the cases aren't supported by the shellplate. The cases are supported by that thick heavy subplate when the cases are driving into the dies. All the shell plate does is slip into the extractor groove, then slide the cases around on the subplate to their next stations. If you raise that shellplate at all, the shellplate can partially support the cases from the extractor groove instead of the subplate, and OAL consistency (and runout) will suffer. At the end of the day, because the cases are support by the subplate, nothing you can do to the shellplate can make things better, only neutral or worse. When I had my LnL, I had that bolt holding the shellplate back out on me a couple of times. I eventually found the right tension to hold it in place. If I remember correctly, it would back out to where it would want to be, then I would check it and think "oh, it's loose," and I'd snug it back down, only to find it "loose" again later. And I ultimately figured out that if I left it alone, it was fine.
  11. IDescribe

    Glock 34 Double Diamond Barrel OAL issue?

    (1) I assume you mean 147gr and not 127gr for that second load? (2) It is valuable to know where you went wrong. One thing I would do is determine the true max OAL on the barrel you are replacing. If you had an OOB, you were problably very close to the max on average anyway. Load a dummy round (size, bell, seat, crimp) to 1.150, plunk and spin test in the pulled barrel, then start shortening .003 at a time until it spins freely. (3) An LnL should not be producing that much OAL variation. Have you modified it? Did you shim/washer the shellplate to tighten things up? If so, remove it. (3) Seems short? Compared to what? There is NOTHING short about 1.12. (4) Standard procedure when shortening OAL on a known load is to re-run load development, start at starting load, and work back up. In practice, shortening .02 with TG is going to be worth about a tenth of a grain of powder, and your load looks super light to begin with. Not even sure that 125gr load would make power factor. With the Blue 125gr at 1.100 OAL, I am showing an average velocity of 1018 with 3.6gr of TG, which was my STARTING load in load development. I would not expect 3.5gr at 1.125 to make power factor, or if so, by just a hair. I shot that bullet with 3.9gr of TG for an average of 1076.
  12. IDescribe

    Hodgdon Titegroup vs VV N320 for 9mm

    N320 is very good for 9mm minor. It is NOT the holy grail. It IS clean. So is American Select. So is Sport Pistol. And at the end of the day, clean doesn't matter. Bullseye is NOT clean, and that is what I shoot most of. I also don't clean my pistols much. And it doesn't matter. When I do clean, it doesn't take any more effort to clean super dirty than it does standard dirty. In my own testing, I have found N320 to produce very accurate ammo -- one of the better ones. I have produced my most accurate 9mm minor loads with Bullseye. American Select is another powder that has produced extremely accurate loads for me. Honestly, if you have a good pistol with a good barrel and a good crown, good bullets, and good bullet to barrel fit, you're going to get good accuracy. Soft shooting? All 9mm minor is soft shooting. I would say there's no reason to go to slower burning powders like CFE Pistol or Power Pistol or WSF or Be-86 or AA5, AA7, bla bla bla for 9mm minor, in part because of additional recoil, and in part because more powder and cost per cartridge to reach the same power factor, but when people start talking about two powders of such similar burn rates at Titegroup and N320 and one being softer than the other, IF there is a perceptible difference there, it's a difference that no one would notice when shooting a stage, a difference that would mean nothing to split times. I have done it during testing -- "Oooooh Ahhhhh... so soft." But once the start timer beeps, you will never notice a difference between similar powders. I have shot a LOT of Titegroup. It is nowhere near my favorite, and generally speaking, it's doesn't beat N320 on anything but price. People will say N320 is a half or three quarters of a penny more per round to shoot with, and they are correct. Personally, I don't buy powder by the round, though. I prefer to buy 16 pounds at a time, so when I buy, and N320 is $450 for 16 pounds, and Bullseye is $260 for 16 pounds... why would I buy N320? Because it's cleaner? No, thank you. Don't care. Because it's more accurate? It isn't. Because it's softer? It isn't. If the price diff between TG and N320 doesn't matter, and those are your only two choices, then YES, N320 all day, every day. But I would suggest maybe those shouldn't be your two choices. If you expand to all the powders available, there are better options than either.
  13. IDescribe

    WST for 9mm

    Zombie thread wants BRAINNNNNSSSSSSS!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  14. IDescribe

    New Eggleston Munitions 147gr flat point

    You dont get leading from the type of coating. You get leading from poor bullet to barrel fit. Some SNS come in sized like Blues at .3555, which is why I dont buy them. Too small.
  15. IDescribe

    New Eggleston Munitions 147gr flat point

    Eggleston uses the HiTek that almost everyone else uses. Blue Bullets has their own proprietary coating. All will smell of not properly chued or if the coating is cut.
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