Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!

hey.moe

Members
  • Content Count

    26
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About hey.moe

  • Rank
    Looks for Match

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    NW Florida
  • Real Name
    Grossman, Stanley

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Not really worried per se. It’s a game. Just a tongue-in-cheek comment on how so many competition guns have gotten away from IDPA’s original premise. I shoot local monthly matches where I know most of the competitors. We take folks at their word. No need for routine checks or chrono.
  2. How about giving folks an option, say, “If the empty gun+mag weighs less than 32 oz, you can drop a mag at any time without penalty.” Might just kill two birds with one stone.
  3. bret, I'm not advocating for having the safety on with the hammer down. Just saying where the RO may have gotten the idea.
  4. Going back to what started this whole discussion, I think I found what the RO was thinking. Take a look at para. 8.1.1.9 (under 8.1.1 Safety Violations - DQ) in the Steel Challenge Rule Book: "Holstering a loaded handgun without the external safety applied or on a revolver, with the hammer cocked." It's not in the USPSA rules, just SC, and I doubt it was intended that way, but ...
  5. Okay, now that IS weird, but good to know. Thanks
  6. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I'm pretty sure attempting to apply the safety on a Shadow or Shadow 2 with the hammer decocked can damage the gun. At least, all mine resist it, so I'm not about to use force on them.
  7. Mine came with three 18-round CZ mags & I’ve been told the gun is legal by folks I trust, so I assume it is. However, I’ve not personally checked that it fits in the IDPA box. I’m planning to shoot an IDPA match this weekend. I’ll try to remember to test it in the box there.
  8. I’m used to starting hammer down so I shoot in SSP, but it’s legal in ESP as well - cocked & locked or hammer down, your choice.
  9. I have a matching pair of Shadow 2s for USPSA and a Target II for IDPA, all from CZ Custom. Grips, sights, and triggers are all as close as possible to identical. I can feel the difference in weight, which in turn, makes the guns balance differently. However, at my level (mid-C Class USPSA) it’s insignificant. I really enjoy shooting all of them, but practically speaking, I’d have been best off with a pair of Target IIs for my purposes.
  10. I just came across this, so I imagine you’ve figured it out by now. Based on the calculations I did for my Target II (similar gun, slightly longer sight radius) I think your prediction of a .230” f/s should have put you right on. So, how did it actually work out?
  11. Through practice your grip will evolve. Small changes in the way you grip the gun can have a profound effect on the way the gun recoils. It's not just a matter of grip strength. After a few months with the M&P you may pick up the Shadow 2 and find it more to your liking, just because of those subtle differences.
  12. hey.moe

    Shadow 2

    I have two Shadow 2s with 11 lb recoil springs which have always been run with the original (clear) thick buffers. I shoot 124 gr Blazer Brass. On both guns I change the buffers when I begin to notice deterioration - deformation or cracking. For me this typically occurs just after 4000 rounds on the buffer. I’m confident I could get more use out of them, but they’re pretty inexpensive, so why risk a failure? I think a new black version is now being sold, so service life may be different.
  13. hey.moe

    S2 Rear Sight

    I replaced the original S2 front sight blade with a Dawson 0.90” width fiber optic and kept the stock rear. Holding the gun in a squared freestyle stance the sum of the light on either side of the F/S equals the width of the blade.
  14. That’s pretty much what the higher mag capacity of Limited allowed me to do.
  15. Just the opposite. Shooting Production I was struggling with just coming up with any plan that would get me through a “memory stage” without shooting a target twice or overlooking a target entirely. Stage planning became much easier for me with more rounds in the mag, from the perspective of not limiting which targets I could afford to shoot from a given position, as well as having more opportunity for make-ups. I was able to finalize my plans sooner and spend more time visualizing and burning them in.
×
×
  • Create New...