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Wild Gene

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About Wild Gene

  • Rank
    Calls Shots
  • Birthday December 13

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Touchet, WA
  • Interests
    Shooting, Hunting, Fishing, spending time with our son on quads at our Mountain pasture
  • Real Name
    Gene Curcio

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  1. Howdy, just an FYI, from the Hornady Tech line. Not all match brass is marked as such anymore. wg ----------------- Mr. Wild Gene, Until last year we always marked our Match brass with the word Match on the base of the bullet. Due to the demand for products, in the last three years, we stopped marking the word Match on the base of the case because the Match and “other” brass is the same. Match brass will have the brown look to the case in the top 1/3 and this if from the final annealing, all brass has this but we was the “non-Match” brass so it does not show. If you’d like to visit with us further please call our Tech Dept. 1-800-338-3220. Thanks, -----------------
  2. I wrote into GAP, they called me immediately. They explained that while the AX mags can work, or be made to work, the other mags are much better, and that I must have been accidentally sent the wrong Mags. They are sending me two replacements, and I will return the two originally supplied. Great Job making things right!!! wg
  3. AICS-vs-AICS-AX-mag.jpg Tom, THANK YOU! Found a picture, yes, I have two of those and four regular ones now. I'll have to read more about them now. Thanks again. If the above link doesn't work, here is another address and article explaining the chassis. http://rifleshooter.com/2013/12/accuracy-international-aics-ax-2-0-chassis-system-review-initial-thoughts/#prettyPhoto wg
  4. I wish they had better pictures. The very small plate on the front of my magazines is probably 1/4"x3/8"by maybe 1/16" thick and only at the top of the front of the magazine on the outside. There appears to be no difference internally, that I have noticed yet, but will go back and measure. wg
  5. Question please. I have some AICS mags that came with my rifle when it was shipped from GAP (I haven't had this rifle very long, less than a year). I recently purchased some new Mags from Mile High Shooting, an AICS distributor. The old mags are really tough to get in and out of the rifle, while the new ones work much better than the old ones ever did. They slide right in and out. Are there different versions or updates of AICS magazines for the 308? When looking at the magazines the only visible difference is the original 10 round mags have a small piece of metal at the top front outside of the magazine, while the new 10 round mags do not have the bump. I also noticed that the original 5 round magazine did not have this bump either. Did AICS do an update, or was I just sent some inferior mags with the rifle. Is there a tuning method similar to the STI mags? I think I could probably just file down the bump, but am not sure if the magazine will maintain structural integrity if I do. I would post pictures if I could figure out how to do it. Thanks, wg
  6. This is another reply, but worth consideration. If you are developing loads at 50 yards, you really need to take SD into consideration of potential performance at farther distances. I'm not sure if everything I've said is properly stated, but I do know that a 50fps variation in muzzle velocity makes a huge difference at 1,000 yards: "If load #1 fired MOA or less groups, it would be a better bet for Long Range shooting, over load 6, depending on the bullet's BC. I would kick out loads with an SD or 20 or more of those options (without even considering extreme spread). Run the Dope charts for a bullet traveling 2600 fps and the same bullet traveling 2650fps and look at the 1,000 yard column. I took some generic figures and there was an almost 20" difference in point of impact. You might have a load that shoots sub MOA at 100, and out past 600 that has such an extreme spread in velocity or high SD that once you get out a ways they are less than satisfactory. SD is using all the rounds in a string checked while ES is only using 2 rounds so your odds are better using SD for calculation of expected average performance verses ES which gives you more of a possible performance (possible, but not probable). Just for fun, throw in the BC's when considering what you are going to use, because as you know, doping the wind is the real fight in this game. Anyway, if 1 MOA is 10" at 1,000 yards and it is measured from the center of your aiming point you have a 5"+/- in any direction. If you have a 50fps difference in velocity at 1,000 yards that works out to 20" (10"+/- up or down) So you are doubling (statistician's feel free to correct this) your decrease in accuracy." wg
  7. If load #1 fired MOA or less groups, it would be a better bet for Long Range shooting, over load 6, depending on the bullet's BC. I would kick out loads with an SD or 20 or more of those options (without even considering extreme spread). Run the Dope charts for a bullet traveling 2600 fps and the same bullet traveling 2650fps and look at the 1,000 yard column. I took some generic figures and there was an almost 20" difference in point of impact. You might have a load that shoots sub MOA at 100, and out past 600 that has such an extreme spread in velocity or high SD that once you get out a ways they are less than satisfactory. SD is using all the rounds in a string checked while ES is only using 2 rounds so your odds are better using SD for calculation of expected average performance verses ES which gives you more of a possible performance (possible, but not probable). Just for fun, throw in the BC's when considering what you are going to use, because as you know, doping the wind is the real fight in this game. Anyway, if 1 MOA is 10" at 1,000 yards and it is measured from the center of your aiming point you have a 5"+/- in any direction. If you have a 50fps difference in velocity at 1,000 yards that works out to 20" (10"+/- up or down) So you are doubling (statistician's feel free to correct this) your decrease in accuracy. Sooo many things to consider, but just using the smallest group is not always the best indication of accuracy/performance at longer range. wg
  8. How do you keep your dope from getting confusing from one stage to the next? Do you wash between stages or just use new colors? wg
  9. I had no idea they have those laminating pouches. I've always just done it with clear strapping tape. This would make it way easier when you figure out a dope update on site to correct your cards. I'd still have my AB app with me regardless. What template are you printing your info out with? Looks like a nice format. I will also make a note that reminds me to not take the shot until I'm fully setup, instead of good enough. wg
  10. Three very good ideas, especially your thoughts on contrasting colors and lighting conditions. Thank you, wg
  11. How do you like to set up your Arm Boards? Do you keep a ballistics chart and just write down clicks, or sketches of the reticle with aiming points? Do you change the card each stage or just write over it with a grease pencil? What is the best way to keep it simple? I just picked up a new arm board from Sunrise Tactical. Very nice board. Thanks. wg
  12. You won't want the light for a USPSA match. Welcome. wg
  13. This is what I've figured out, but on the other hand, unless you are at the right match that has a tactical class for the 308's, you aren't going to be super competitive with the 308 either. It sounds like you have all you bases covered and can shoot well enough already, so unless you do plan to compete, go with whatever you are comfortable with. If you hadn't added that you have the 264 or the Norma, then I would say try the Mil glass. I sure would consider the Burris for the money, just make sure you can look through one since you are accustomed to Leupold glass already. I LOVE my Leupold glass. You may as well look at the Kahles stuff too. They get overlooked and are excellent glass. wg
  14. You bought it! Congratulations. I'd ask around and go to a few long range tactical competitions, if that is where you would eventually like to end up shooting, and see what those guys are using for the reticle, MOA/MOA or MIL/MIL. Ask any friends you might be shooting with too. The benefit of using what they area using is that they can help you get on target faster if you are using the same thing. If they are spotting with their scope, they can call your hits and corrections quickly if you are both using MIL or MOA glass. wg
  15. I personally think it is more a matter of consistency. What ever you do, with that particular rifle, needs to be repeated every time. You really need to let the reticle "self center" within the scope tube, you need to have a round circle, and you need to see an even amount of black around that circle every time. You need to have an amount of pressure that enables you to do that every time you fire the rifle. wg
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