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Sliv2

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About Sliv2

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    Looks for Target

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    alexm.sliv@gmail.com

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    Milwaukee, WI
  • Real Name
    Alex Slivinski

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  1. Nobody in a leadership role saw an issue with a swinger only available at the top of the arc, through a small window, behind an opaque vision barrier? That's neat.
  2. I didn't know CZ was making Atlas guns now
  3. Schultz Gun Club, Muskego, WI Northern Illinois Shooters Association, also Muskego, WI (shared range) Oconomowoc Sportsmans Club, Oconomowoc, WI A little further north: Ripon Gun Club, Ripon, WI Fox Valley Practical Shooters, also Ripon, WI (shared range)
  4. I should also note that if you live far enough east of the metro area, Eau Claire (WI) may be a viable option. They have several good ranges.
  5. Pine Island is about 45 minutes south of the Cities and well worth the drive. I was a member there during my undergrad. Membership was very affordable, no hassle signing up, and a great facility. https://www.piwpsc.org/
  6. Another vote for Ben's materials.
  7. I don't recall what I initially classified as in 2015, but I believe it was C. I'm currently an 83% A (somewhat sandbagging against my will; I generally finish with the middle-of-the-pack Ms) that practices 6 days per week. The length of a training session varies by the day. Some days, I can only fit in 15 minutes of dryfire. Some days I do 90-120 minutes of live fire and then do another 30-60 of dryfire. I think I ramped up my training at the end of 2016 and it was mostly what it is now by early 2017. I've actually dialed back the quantity of training in the past year in exchange for better quality. (E.g., I was doing 90-120 minutes of dryfire six days per week during 2017)
  8. I think you have a solid grasp of the concept with regards to the drop steps. With regards to the body vs. transition concept, I think the discussion on this forum blows the use of your lower body out of proportion. It's very useful for targets that are very spread out, especially beyond a 90 degree swing. However, simple arrays should not require much, if any, body movement. Stoeger's transition drills have helped me a bunch here, especially his "computer mouse" analogy. Short version: If you want to move your mouse quickly on the screen, you don't muscle it around or snap it aggressively. You simply look where you want it to go and then move it there. Think of your sights the same way. Lead with your eyes and put the gun there. You don't need to muscle, snap, crackle, or pop the gun there.
  9. This was, to no surprise, another great match. Many thanks to Shana and company. I also wanted to commend the ROs on Stage 1 for running things properly and actually calling the RM to fix a heavy-set popper. I believe that was a first for me at a major match.
  10. No, the SP01 and Shadow 2 use different slide stops and are not compatible.
  11. Some really low hanging fruit for you is movement and transitions. With regards to movement, you don't set up wide or low and you're often off-balance for no reason (see the static positions where you lift a foot up). You also stand up in nearly every position and do a number of unnecessary drop-steps. See the 16 second mark of the last video... If you had set up wide, you could have started to lean out of position and then push off hard. Instead you had to drop your knees and do a little drop step. Transitions: I can see you over-transitioning on a huge percentage of targets. There's also instances where you can see you're just dragging across the targets without actually stopping. The steel array on Stage 5 is a convenient example because you do both there. Learn to smoothly transition the gun so it comes to a stop exactly where you want it to. This will require NOT muscling the gun around and eliminating a lot of tension in your shoulders and arms. I'd agree with your assessment of short movement reloads. I'd also add stage memorization/visualization in there. There were a number of instances where it was clear you missed the spot you wanted to be in. Take the time to carefully memorize and visualize all of those details during your walkthrough. Keep up the good work!
  12. Legal inquiries should be directed to your attorney.
  13. It can be addressed with dry-fire. When you work on movement, stop at the end of each run and check your stance. Are your feet wide enough? Are your knees bent? Is your weight loaded the way you want it to be? Adding video can help as well, especially confirming whether you actually stayed low or just thought you did.
  14. Is it possible for a hammer or sear to be "overly" fitted (for lack of a better term)? I'm perplexed by my match gun. It had been sent to one of the popular CZ gunsmith shops, they have done several of my guns with outstanding results, and works perfectly with match ammo. However, with an 11.5 spring, it won't reliably light Winchester or harder primers in practice ammo. My practice gun is a stock S2 with the 11.5 spring and lights everything. They both have extended firing pins and matching springs. The only difference then is the fitting and the CZC hammer in the match gun. Thus, I've narrowed it to 1) the hammer itself generating less force; or 2) the fitting of the parts. Thoughts?
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