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JimP42

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About JimP42

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    RTP, NC
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    Jim Pendergraft

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  1. Definitely mechanical for the lock. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  2. Yep. That’s a real safe. A UL rating of TL-15 or better. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  3. Bolting it down is required for any kind of security. It isn’t that hard to just steal a 1000 lb safe and cut it open later. I have moved my ~ 2’x2’x6’ safes several times and they are around 600 each empty. A couple of big guys with some wood broom handles, rope, and a come-along could do it. If you rent and can’t bolt them down then a good alarm and quick police response time can run them off. I keep the metal cutting saw blades for my circ saw and sawzall in one of the safes. Your own tools can be used against you. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  4. You probably can’t afford the “most reliable safe” or don’t want to at least. Size needed? Do you have an alarm system? Police response time? Does it need fire insulation or will it be somewhere that doesn’t matter? A good value in the middle of the market is sturdysafe.com. Mostly security (meaning thick steel) and not much bling :-) Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  5. It's probably the same LED focused on a larger/smaller area, so technically they are probably the same total brightness. Which would make the 3MOA more intense.
  6. One change becoming an RO is that you aren't watching the shooting/results, you are watching the shooter/gun, and the muzzle and trigger finger in particular. Not the ROs job to judge hits or anything else downrange - it's to make sure nothing gets out of control uprange.
  7. Why? 550 is more capable, much easier to change calibers, easier to use, easier to sell. Definitely worth a few extra bucks.
  8. I have a stainless Loaded 9mm that I had to finish ream just slightly but that was at least 5 yrs ago. Also switched from Dillon to Lee FCD and no more problems. That was a backup - my main Loaded never had an issue.
  9. I have a stainless Loaded 9mm that I had to finish ream just slightly but that was at least 5 yrs ago. Also switched from Dillon to Lee FCD and no more problems. That was a backup - my main Loaded never had an issue.
  10. It's a slippery slope, but really there is no point for all your calibers. Just plan on your primary calibers that you need to load a lot of. For me 9mm (147gr DVC load) and probably 223 prep. For you maybe none, if don't shoot any one caliber a lot, or different one(s). I will continue to use my 550 for 45, 300blk, 30-06, other 9mm loads, and 223 loading. 9 is the only thing I want to load an ammo can of 1200 at a time. Which I should do tonight now that I think about it.
  11. 550 for lower volume, and cheaper, and easier changes. If you expect to load lots of calibers, go 550. 650 doesn't make sense to me without case feeder. If you expect to load a LOT (more than 1k/month) of one or two calibers, go 650.
  12. I have a 550 with heads for 6 calibers as well as dedicated prep heads for 556 and 300BO. I am tempted to get a 650 or 1050 for bulk 9 and 223 but I think I will always keep the 550. You don't really need a powder check for straight wall pistol rounds if you can pay attention and look for powder before putting on each bullet. Much more critical for bottleneck cases.
  13. ^^THIS^^I would ditch a powder sensor before I used a combo die. A $10 light clipped to the press will do everything a powder check will For pistol definitely. For .223, not so much.
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