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rr4406pak

Cylinder Chamfering on a Revolver

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I just got my S&W 610 back from the custom shop.

I had the cylinders chamfered but it does not appear like the gunsmith did an aggressive enough job with it.

Reloads do not go as easy as I'd hoped.

Can anybody send or post me some pictures of a really good chamfering job on their revolver.

This way when I bring the revolver back I can show him and say this is what I want.

Thanks in advance!

Edited by rr4406pak

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UW Mitch   
Here's my 686. I did the chamfering with the kit from brownells. I think it came out pretty good.

Gary

Did you use this tool?

45° MUZZLE/CYLINDER CHAMFERING CUTTER & STEEL PILOT

http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/Pro...20STEEL%20PILOT

If so, do you just carefully apply pressure and turn by hand until it's as deep as you want it?

~Mitch

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Here's my 686. I did the chamfering with the kit from brownells. I think it came out pretty good.

Gary

Did you use this tool?

45° MUZZLE/CYLINDER CHAMFERING CUTTER & STEEL PILOT

http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/Pro...20STEEL%20PILOT

If so, do you just carefully apply pressure and turn by hand until it's as deep as you want it?

~Mitch

Yes, that's the tool I used. I cut as deep as it would allow me too. Any farther and the whole tool would've chambered. :roflol:

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Toolguy   
I just got my S&W 610 back from the custom shop.

I had the cylinders chamfered but it does not appear like the gunsmith did an aggressive enough job with it.

Reloads do not go as easy as I'd hoped.

Can anybody send or post me some pictures of a really good chamfering job on their revolver.

This way when I bring the revolver back I can show him and say this is what I want.

Thanks in advance!

If you chamfer the star (extractor) more than just an edge break, it will not pull the cases out reliably. Then you will end up

pulling out individual ones, or digging them out from under the star when they come out part way then are pushed back in

as the ejector rod is released. Either way makes for very slow reloads. The best way is to chamfer the holes a little bit,

then remove the star from the cylinder (the ejector rod has a left hand thread) and finish chamfering just the cylinder,

then reassemble.

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Toolguy,

What you said does not make sense if we are talking about using moonclips correct?

How can chamfering the extractor excessively affect extraction when you are using moonclips?

Edited by rr4406pak

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Bubber   
Toolguy,

What you said does not make sense if we are talking about using moonclips correct?

How can chamfering the extractor excessively affect extraction when you are using moonclips?

440, On the 686 pictured of Highvelocity it does not appear to be cut for moonclips. I could be wrong but most of the cylinders cut for moonclips usually have been milled just where the moonclips would hit and leave the outside ridge so one may shoot rounds singularly. And if this is the case one must be carefull about being agressive on the star as the star may slip off the round and leave it in the cylinder and then the star will shove it back and you are stuck with a brass "under the star". I really don't know how agressive you can be and stay out of trouble as other items will also cause the brass to become stuck under the star. Then again I may be all wet, it is time for my weekly shower. later rdd

edited to add. The newer cylinders no longer have the pins hold the star solid with the cylinder ( this was done a long time ago) And the design of the star has the rounds and edges of the star holding the cylinder and star secure. One can cause the star to be less solid with the cylinder if tow much material is remove. Just a theory.

Edited by Bubber

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vernbo   
WOW! That radiusing (SP?) looks SWEET!

Is that more expensive compared to chamfering?

not expensive at all , done in house ,helps when working in a machine shop.

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Toolguy   
Toolguy,

What you said does not make sense if we are talking about using moonclips correct?

How can chamfering the extractor excessively affect extraction when you are using moonclips?

If you ONLY use moonclips it doesn't matter.

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vernbo   
What do you use to number the chambers like that?

Dave Sinko

standard metal numbering stamps,hand held, hit with hammer.

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Carmoney   
Toolguy,

What you said does not make sense if we are talking about using moonclips correct?

How can chamfering the extractor excessively affect extraction when you are using moonclips?

If you ONLY use moonclips it doesn't matter.

Careful, though......the newer guns use those odd-shaped ends of the extractor star to align the star with the cylinder (no more holes and pins), so if you go too far with the chamfer you can alter the timing enough that the cylinder won't carry up properly. Just take it easy, especially out at the ends of the star.

Edited by Carmoney

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hopalong   

What Carmoney said.

PLUS

Don't get too wild and cut the star too thin between the charge holes...............the ends of the star will break off !!!!!

(Ask me at a match one of these days) :wacko:

Hopalong

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I showed your pictures of the chamfered cylinders to my gunsmith (who did not chamfer the cylinders enough the first time) of what I wanted and he about freaked out on me.

He said I was going to ruin the gun, void the warranty, it is unsafe and he'd make me sign a document that I would not sue him if I got hurt using the gun.

This gunsmith had a reputation of excellent gun work but can be highly emotional & moody, but this is the first time I actually saw it.

He was pacing behind the counter while I was talking to him slamming things around having a fit. WTF? :surprise:

He was saying if I used high power 10mm loads I could have a case failure. The gun would be unsafe. "Your going to destroy the gun!!! he kept saying"

I was like holy crap "I'm only using this gun in competition".

The situation caught me off guard and I just signed the paper and got out of there. :mellow:

Later at home I thought about what just transpired. I just wanted my gun back at this point. I left a message for him that night not to do anything to it I'll pick it up tomorrow. I didn't want to deal with this. Went there first thing in the morning to get the gun back and it was too late. He said he cut the chamfer larger so when the shell is against the breechface the cylinder still goes all the way down to the bottom of the supported case "and I'm not cutting it any farther!". He showed the gun to me and stomped off in disgust. The job he did is actually very good, but man he had my stomach in knots freaking out on me like that.

The guy has emotional issues or something... geez...

Should have just sent it to Randy Lee. So much for trying to support the local gunsmith.. :angry2:

(sorry for long post)

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In this highly litigious day and age it sounds like he intially did freak out, but then explained his concerns and why, also stating if you did this modification that the factory warantee would be gone as well, and warned about blowing a case with hot loads. He then decided to do it with you signing a useless piece of paper. Sounds like you have a good gunsmith that you took out of his comfort zone. He didnt like it, but was up to the challenge and did a good job.

I would say thanks, and later let him know what a good job he did on it. My smith doesnt like doing some of the stuff I have him do, and one good smith DID NOT want to cut down a cylinder to Short Colt length for me, and called me as it was in his machine ready to cut......making sure again that I wanted it done.......It is all in a days work......

Just another perspective...and you know what HOP says about opinions..... :roflol:

Enjoy your gun!

DougC

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Carmoney   
This gunsmith had a reputation of excellent gun work but can be highly emotional & moody, but this is the first time I actually saw it. He was pacing behind the counter while I was talking to him slamming things around having a fit.

Completely unacceptable. Life's too short to deal with a nut job like that.

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Here's the pic of the job he did on the 610.

Not as aggressive as the earlier posted pictures but reloads are much better than before...

post-11047-1209653768.jpg

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