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shred

Thinking Practical Shooting

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I got this book yesterday (thanks BE!) and pretty much sat down and read it cover to cover.

It's a valuable book and one I'll start recommending. Much more of a sit-down read than Perfect Practice-- you won't need your rig on to read it, but after that you might want to bring it along to the range occasionally.

Saul states that the book is about everything but technique, and he's mostly right. Technique creeps in here and there (plus a bonus section on shooting swingers), but 90% of the material isn't technique. So why study it? Because the not-technique parts are key to doing well consistently, especially at big matches, and in improving your shooting long-term. If you can't hit the broad side of a barn from the inside, get a technique book or class first, and this will in no way replace practicing, but if you're frustrated by your progress later on, check this one out.

It has some parts similar to With Winning in Mind, and some parts similar to Shooting From Within, and even some similar to Matt's Practical Shooting Manual and Brian's book but none of these books can entirely replace or be replaced with this one, though if you only could buy one of the first three, I'd probably suggest getting this one. A good part of the content I've not seen in any other shooting books.

The parts I'll find most useful are those on match stress, mental games, and stage and match tactics, but there's a lot there for everybody. The writing is clear and easy to read, though you'll have to put up with illustrations of classic targets only.

Get it here: http://www.brianenos.com/store/books.html The table of contents and an excerpt are on line.

Edited by shred

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I received a copy from my wife for my b-day - going to start in to it soon - will post some thoughts when I have them... :) I'm looking forward to reading it. The stock it's printed on is interesting - the book feels a lot heavier than it looks... perhaps knowledge has gained mass??? :lol:

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One of my favorites in the book is "Deciding What to Practice." (p 92) Using a spreadsheet to establish training priorities is brilliant. (bigJoni say's I can make a spreadsheet do anything.)

I can't imagine it wouldn't be beneficial for any serious competitor, regardless of class.

be

A good part of the content I've not seen in any other shooting books.

+1

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The stock it's printed on is interesting - the book feels a lot heavier than it looks...

That's the first thing I thought when I opened it up: "Oh, this is printed on nice paper".

-Chet

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That's the first thing I thought when I opened it up: "Oh, this is printed on nice paper".

And Chethro would know ;):)

Finished the book a couple of weeks ago. This book definitely fills a hole in my bookshelf. If only I'd had that book when I first got started - would've saved me a lot of time and money. There's a lot of hard earned wisdom in there, stuff that one normally only learns through trial and error, making the mistakes, or lots of conversations with more experienced folks (who've made the mistakes, or done the experimentation).

I agree with Brian, the spreadsheet technique of deciding what to practice is intriguing - and extremely logical. It's right up my alley...

Part of me also went "Dude, you're giving away the jewels of the kingdom!!" as I read through it ;) It's bad enough that I'm back on the learning curve, now you're shortening it for everyone else... <_<:P:D:D

This one goes on my "Recommended" list :) Nice work, Saul!

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One of my favorites in the book is "Deciding What to Practice." (p 92) Using a spreadsheet to establish training priorities is brilliant. (bigJoni say's I can make a spreadsheet do anything.)

Last year, when I bought Steve Anderson's great book, I figured out I had to decide what to train on, so I went on and made a small schedule for my weekly training: 2 dryfire sessions (mostly tue and thu night), 1 livefire session (sunday morning), and 1 pre-match session to refresh the whole thing.

I used Steve's drills for this, and separated them according to the above schedule.

Of course I had to lay this down on a spreadsheet... ;)

Tabella_allenamento.zip

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Thanks for all the great feedback guys,

it's nice to read that all that hard work is being appreciated.

Yes - I am giving away all the secrets, and yes, this can save real time for those learning to improve, at all levels.

But I see no problem with that - that is the goal of the book.

Although I am a competitor myself, I am also a coach, and I am always open about sharing my techniques and ideas. Others will still have to do the work if they want to beat me.... :D And if they do - I am fine with it. As long as I shoot well, I am happy!

Great shooting everyone

Saul Kirsch,

Double-Alpha Academy

http://www.doublealpha.biz

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Saul,

It is a great book and I am now on the 2nd reading because it is like Brian's book, something new pops out everytime I read it.

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The stock it's printed on is interesting - the book feels a lot heavier than it looks... perhaps knowledge has gained mass??? :lol:

I popped a review of the book up on my blog at: http://re-gun.blogspot.com/2007/11/recomme...-practical.html

I find it kind of funny that I basically made the same comment again in the review - again after picking the book up and going "man, that book really feels dense..." :D Reading back through it again - still have to say its highly recommended.... Good good stuff....

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There are four books that have impacted my shooting exponentially...Thinking Practical Shooting is certainly one of them...so much so that I would say that it is a "must have" for all shooters.

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There are four books that have impacted my shooting exponentially...Thinking Practical Shooting is certainly one of them...so much so that I would say that it is a "must have" for all shooters.

What are your other three? I'm still getting plenty out of Practical Shooting and Refinement and Repetition, but I'd like to know what to queue up next.

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What are your other three? I'm still getting plenty out of Practical Shooting and Refinement and Repetition, but I'd like to know what to queue up next.

Just my opinion, but hey! In no particular order:

Practical Shooting Beyond Fundamentals-Brian Enos

Thinking Practical Shooting-Saul Kirsch

Refinement and Repetition (I and II)-Steve Anderson

With Winning In Mind-Lanny Bassham

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What's better is that all of these books just happen to be available in Brian's store! You can nab 'em all in one spot.

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Most likely With Winning in Mind is the last one.

Guess the Lanny Bassham .sig should have been a giveaway!

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