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Best Cheap Way To Lighten A Trigger On An Ar-15?

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I have a new DPMS, and I love it. But after shooting my IPSC 1911 with a 2.5# trigger for several thousand rounds, the DPMS trigger is a bit tough(Feels like 10#).

Whats the best/cheapest way to have it lightened? JP triggers come highly reccmmended but parts and labor run around $200, and I'm just a casual rifle shooter.

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I have a new DPMS, and I love it. But after shooting my IPSC 1911 with a 2.5# trigger for several thousand rounds, the DPMS trigger is a bit tough(Feels like 10#).

Whats the best/cheapest way to have it lightened? JP triggers come highly reccmmended but parts and labor run around $200, and I'm just a casual rifle shooter.

I've done trigger jobs and played with springs, but I still go back to the JP,actually they are pretty easy to install, and once they are in, no more messing with

my 2 cents

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EricW   

JP sells the reduced-power springs for a few bucks each. You'll need to lighten your hammer to get 100% ignition. If you're handy wth a welder, there's a way to zap a pad onto the bottom of the trigger bar to reduce the engagement and improve the pull.

Buy the springs and save your money for a JP. Every AR should come with a JP stock. It should be the law.

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JP springs are the "CHEAPEST" way to get your trigger a little lighter. The complete trigger and hammer are awesome if you want to pay for them.

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Huck   

If you have the ability and the tools you can,

1, replace the springs, 2, lighten the hammer, 3 cut the engagement down on the hammer, 4 clean up the sear/trigger, and 5, install hex screws to make the trigger adjustable similar to a JP. I wouldn't do step 5 unless you have a good drill press and you know what you're doing.

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George   

Try a trigger prep with Moly in it on the sear after cleaning and inspecting for rust/swarf. Shoot it for a while and accept it for what it is, a cheap trigger. Please don't do anything to the sear surfaces on pot metal triggers, the springs are the only real safe mods on normal trigger systems. Again, the JP is cheap for what it does. Nothing else really does it as well.

--

Regards,

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sfinney   

For Lo-buck I'd replace the springs and lightly stone the sear/hammer surfaces..... a really good trigger slick type oil might help some. You'll have a decent single stage trigger, that may or may not need total replacement at some point and reworking down the road.... or spend the money on a JP kit and never look back.

The $ for a new trigger hurts now, but its the best money you can spend on your AR, period (followed by a free float handguard and a good muzzle brake). You won't regret it. ;)

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Carlos   

How about free?

Use at your own risk: http://www.geocities.com/molonlaberkba/triggerjob.html or

DIY Trigger Job

Now how does this compare to the JP? I have no idea since I have never done BOTH. Have installed JPs on friends guns & they are fine triggers; my own guns use bone stock parts. If someone has done BOTH & would care to comment, please do so. Regards, D.

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I've got a small pin Jard 3lb. adjustable trigger I'd let you have for cheap. You can set pre travel, over travel, and there's a screw to adjust for the safety. I think they're good triggers for the money.

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chp5   
JP sells the reduced-power springs for a few bucks each.  You'll need to lighten your hammer to get 100% ignition.

+1

Just cut off the "tail" on your hammer and you'll have 100% ignition.

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Westy   

I have the JP tigger on my DPMS and I think this is the best. One of my fellow shooters has the DPMS trigger and JP reduced power springs and we can compare side by side.

If you need to go cheap, those JP springs do wonders for the stock trigger. The full trigger set-up is still way better, and one thing you don't get with springs is stops.

If you need cheap, get the springs from JP. While you are at it, get the cooley comp too. You can get this clocked for left or right handed shooters.

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XRe   
Just cut off the "tail" on your hammer and you'll have 100% ignition.

Is that "100% ignition of every round in the magazine"??? ;):lol:

Excuse my ignorance of ARs and their parts... :)

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chp5   
Just cut off the "tail" on your hammer and you'll have 100% ignition.

Is that "100% ignition of every round in the magazine"??? ;):lol:

Excuse my ignorance of ARs and their parts... :)

The reduced power JP springs work best with a lightened hammer. The AR hammer has a tail-like section on it. That tail serves a function on a class 3 rifle I think, but it's unnecessary on a semi rifle. It's hard steel, but patience and a Dremel can remove it.

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XRe   
The reduced power JP springs work best with a lightened hammer.  The AR hammer has a tail-like section on it.  That tail serves a function on a class 3 rifle I think, but it's unnecessary on a semi rifle.  It's hard steel, but patience and a Dremel can remove it.

Ah... sorry. I thought you might be making a tongue and cheek reference for how to create a "hammer follow" situation ;):) That's what I meant by "100% ignition of every round in the mag" :)

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PacMan   
Since we're talking triggers, how 'bout the Rock River 2-stage match trigger? Anyone running that set-up? Good, bad?

Yes, I had one in a backup rifle, but just couldn't get used to the 2-stage feel since I have the JP single stage in my match rifle. The RRA 2-Stage is a pretty good unit for the $, specially after it is tuned :) but then the JP is only another $50.

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Garrett   
The complete trigger and hammer are awesome if you want to pay for them.

And I might add that they're well worth it.
The reduced power JP springs work best with a lightened hammer.  The AR hammer has a tail-like section on it.  That tail serves a function on a class 3 rifle I think, but it's unnecessary on a semi rifle. 

It doesn't even work on a full-auto rifle. The F/A hammer has a little hook on the back of the "tail" to engage the auto-sear. The hook was removed in the semi-auto verson. I imagine the rest of the tail was retained to keep enough mass to light off heavy military primers.

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Keith   
I have a new DPMS, and I love it. But after shooting my IPSC 1911 with a 2.5# trigger for several thousand rounds, the DPMS trigger is a bit tough(Feels like 10#).

Whats the best/cheapest way to have it lightened? JP triggers come highly reccmmended but parts and labor run around $200, and I'm just a casual rifle shooter.

Just get that Glock back out of retirement and shoot it for a while instead of your fancy race gun and the DPMS will feel like it has a match trigger. :D

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Since we're talking triggers, how 'bout the Rock River 2-stage match trigger? Anyone running that set-up? Good, bad?

Yes, I had one in a backup rifle, but just couldn't get used to the 2-stage feel since I have the JP single stage in my match rifle. The RRA 2-Stage is a pretty good unit for the $, specially after it is tuned :) but then the JP is only another $50.

I have been running a RRA two stage trigger for about 6 months. Dropped in with around a 40 ounce letoff, contributing to at least several "doubles" per range session while I tried getting used to it. After several sessions, I pulled the trigger and cleaned up the trigger/disconnector interface to try increasing the 2nd stage slightly. Now at 44 ounces, no more doubles, and I am liking it well enough considering the low cost (under $100).

The JP single stage I've shot at 3#'s for over 7 years is a better overall trigger as far as feel and user confidence, and has never doubled on me.

Paladin

ETA:8-26 I installed another RRA NM trigger this week in a '78 Colt SP1. The first stage is about 32 oz., the overall weight is a little over 72 oz., the highest my gauge goes. A little more than 4.5#, but not much. The first stage takeup can be treated like "play in the system", and my index finger almost believes the 2nd stage is just a 3# single stage with no creep. Paladin

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spd522   

I put just the JP springs in my stock SP1 lower and it dropped to 4#. I need to do a bit of polishing on the stock parts but it runs pretty slick as is right now.

I have another lower with the JP springs that I experimented with and got down to 2#. Still ran great but I wasn't comfortable with it that light for anything other than bench or bipod work. So I took it back up to 3#.

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kurtm   

Cheapest way??? Cut about half of the hammer spring leg off on the right hand side so it no longer sits on the trigger pin but butts up against the front of the hammer/trigger mill cut. Apply moly past to engagement surfaces....DONE!!! I guess the major cost to this way of doing it would be the cost of the side cutters if you couldn't borrow a pair! :D Kurt M

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