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SlvrDragon50

Mentally overcoming the urge to reload - Production

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1 hour ago, fastluck13 said:

Count through the walk-through. During the run, I count misses. If I know I need them all, as soon as I have an extra shot I can expect the reload.

Same as me, nice! 

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3 hours ago, fastluck13 said:

Sorry, shots. 8 round arrays or 10 round mag capacity. I usually shoot SS and have a major and a minor gun so I always have a count going with walk throughs.

I'll be sure to incorporate that. I think that'll help quite a bit since it's more active cognitively. 

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8 minutes ago, SlvrDragon50 said:

I'll be sure to incorporate that. I think that'll help quite a bit since it's more active cognitively. 

Definitely make sure your stage plans reflects your division capacity.  

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Just now, TravisNC said:

Definitely make sure your stage plans reflects your division capacity.  

I will. I've never counted shots before though. I've just gone through "shooting" at each target and trying to determine where I will reload based on arrays of 4-5 targets. Definitely too passive of a process.

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On 5/10/2017 at 0:32 PM, SlvrDragon50 said:

However, every time I move, I feel the urge to reload, and all four times I ran the stage yesterday I reloaded even when I consciously went into the stage telling myself to NOT reload. 

 

I'm finding that the more I focus on not reloading at the start of the stage, the more it will impact me if I do end up reloading.

 

I think focusing so much on what not to do can be distracting.  Visualizing what TO do is a skill and needs to be practiced.  Throwing a lot of NOTs in there might be counterproductive.

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more visualization/programming of your stage plan.  IMO it's not a matter of practicing moving without reloading.  It's about having your stage plan 100% locked down in your mind before stepping up to the line.  

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On 5/12/2017 at 5:01 PM, SlvrDragon50 said:

I will. I've never counted shots before though. I've just gone through "shooting" at each target and trying to determine where I will reload based on arrays of 4-5 targets. Definitely too passive of a process.

 

Production shooter here:

 

Its an afterproduct of counting the number of shots needed during my initial stage plan... but the information I choose to retain is the number of *spare* rounds I'll have in each mag.

 

If I know that I had two extra rounds but then I fired two make-up shots on steel in the first half of an array? I know the remaining targets need to be shot very delibrately because I'm already going to be shooting to slide-lock if I execute cleanly. Etc etc

 

Edited by MemphisMechanic

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On 5/10/2017 at 11:32 AM, SlvrDragon50 said:

Is this just something that will go away as I become more experienced?

 

Yes. 

 

 

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It costs you no time to reload during the move so just do it and  don't worry.  There  is no penalty for being prepared.  Practice your reloads until they are perfect .

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When you visualize, don't use words in your head, use pictures. If you tell yourself, "shoot these targets, move over there but DON'T reload, shoot those targets", your subconscious will be programmed with the "reload" part of "DON'T reload", too. Visualize your reloads and movement with great detail...hell, visualize everything with great detail over and over.

 

(Yup, regurgitating Steve Anderson in that last paragraph! )

 

My biggest problem with extra and skipped reloads is switching back and forth between Single Stack and Limited at the same match. My first stage plan is still burnt in and can affect my 2nd stage plan, so gotta really program the stage plan hard.

 

Sent from my SM-G900P using Tapatalk

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, AzShooter said:

It costs you no time to reload during the move so just do it and  don't worry.  There  is no penalty for being prepared.  Practice your reloads until they are perfect .

That's hard to believe.  Moving from point A to point B without reloading should be faster than with reloading.  If not, move faster. 

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Just wanted to say that I tried counting shots when I did my walk throughs yesterday, and it made a tremendous difference.

 

I had to reload on every movement, but I was a lot faster on transitioning as I didn't have to consciously think about which target to shoot at next.

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Oh! And I found dryfire stages in my house where you have 2 paper in one room and 3 paper in the nearby hallway (engaging everything with 1 mag) and with just enough movement to BEG your brain to reload... to be a huge help here.

 

Follow that with another position that has 8 shots required, so you have to load to move into it. This way you're moving and loading AND moving without a reload.

 

Then run your little stage in all kinds of ways, so you learn to do it forwards and backwards.Just a thought but it helped me break this habit.

 

The simpler version of this is to simply spend a few weeks dryfiring moving and shooting without any reloads at all, ever. Then add them in during the match.

 

Edited by MemphisMechanic

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My routine at stages after the briefing goes like this:

1) count all targets to make sure I'm not missing any (32 round comstock all metric) I better see 16 metric targets. 

2) find the start position and give a good look around to see if there's any targets that can be engaged from the start position

3) hazards, such as 180 traps or footing issues,line of sight, no shoots, hard cover etc.

4) then I look at trying to go left to right. Being right handed, doing reloads moving right makes for less a chance of a 180 violation. Going left to right isn't always possible. But I prefer it. 

5) find targets in groups no larger than 5 for production.

6) try walk throughs finding those groups and making sure there's no issues such as having to go back if I need a make up shot or end up zig zagging wasting time. ALWAYS LOOK FOR BEST SPOT TO STAND THAT ALLOWS YOU TO ENGAGE MULTIPLE TARGETS. sometimes standing dead center of a stage allows you to shoot multiple targets that would have to be shot from 2,3, or 4 different spots if you went in to close to ports or walls. Sometimes standing back gives you a better view. DON'T GET TUNNEL VISION!!

7) plan reloads. Now I have a plan of which targets I'm gonna shoot from where and now it's time to plan where to reload, ideally I want to reload only after 10 shots and while moving. But each stage determines that. 

8) mental replay. Now I visualize what my plan is and get as many walk throughs as I can in the 5 minutes. 

9) stick with MY plan!  Don't let someone shooting limited tell you not to reload there. It's already decided the way I'm gonna shoot. Changing it last minute for me only screws me up. 

10) once the shooting begins if I'm not first I'm constantly going over the same plan in my head. I'll close my eyes and listen for the start timer. Then mentally I go through my stage plan. 

11) once I'm at the line I get in my start position, check my mags, on the command I take my sight picture, load, make ready, and holster.  Then I go through it one more time looking at each target and motioning reloads. 

12) execute!  Whether it goes 100% to plan or to shit is up to you!

I don't always run on stages do to a back injury, but I lack in speed I make up for in a good stage plan and good hits. Running a stage super fast with 3 bobbled reloads and a bunch of "Mikes" is useless. Go at the pace that allows you to get Alphas. 

Ive ran stages in double the time as the next guy and still had a higher HF because of his poor shooting.  Keep up the training and always visualize your plan!  

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Sounds like it was already covered in here. But this is all your stage plan. Commit your stage plan to memory before you get to the line and then go over 3 more times on the load and make ready. 

Not the most efficient thing but when your done with one array and the next one is extremely close, start pointing your gun at the target already when moving. 

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