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AzNooB

To shoot or not to shoot?

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I recently got back into practical shooting, and there are just some days I don't feel like I'm on my A game - especially if I'm shooting more than once a week. I can't decide if it's worth it for me to shoot other matches with a low level of mental focus, or to just wait until it's all there.

 

My main goal is to improve my skills in USPSA as efficiently as possible. Would it be safe to skip out on the IDPA/Steel/Weeknight Matches/Etc. if I'm not feeling it?

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If you want to improve your USPSA skills, I wouldn't recommend doing other disciplines (IDPA, Steel) they can be confusing. It's kinda like practicing a bad habit. Not knocking either one of them (I've done both) but the difference can mess with your mental game. Weeknight matches would depend on how they're set up. I do one that uses USPSA rules (sort of, on an inside range, it's tough to duplicate outdoor stages)

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Improving the mental game is just as important.  Finding the way to bring your mental focus, even when you are not "feeling it" is a part of the game or games.  Now, all that goes out the window if you overdue yourself.  You are the only one that can make that call.  I, personally, don't find it mentally difficult to switch between styles of shoots.  If it gives you a problem, then follow Bkreutz advice, or find a way to up your mental game.  Another way to go is to try to fit your match schedule to when you are sure you can bring the mental focus you expect to have and shoot whatever style of match fills the bill.  Much of the differences in the game can be worked on in dry fire and not have a detrimental effect of switching styles of shoots.

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3 hours ago, AzNooB said:

  Would it be safe to skip  the IDPA/Steel/Weeknight Matches/Etc. if I'm not feeling it?

 

Absolutely.

 

Why bother, if you're "not feeling it" - no advantage to shooting what you don't enjoy.

 

 

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It depends on what the goal is. If your goal is to take it seriously and really improve, then the vast majority of the time you should do it even when you don't feel like it. Discipline is 100 times more valuable than motivation. If this is just a hobby and you don't want to take it seriously, then yeah for sure just do it when you feel like it.

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On 4/5/2017 at 4:14 PM, Jake Di Vita said:

It depends on what the goal is. If your goal is to take it seriously and really improve, then the vast majority of the time you should do it even when you don't feel like it. Discipline is 100 times more valuable than motivation. If this is just a hobby and you don't want to take it seriously, then yeah for sure just do it when you feel like it.

 

Good stuff.

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On 4/5/2017 at 6:14 PM, Jake Di Vita said:

It depends on what the goal is. If your goal is to take it seriously and really improve, then the vast majority of the time you should do it even when you don't feel like it. Discipline is 100 times more valuable than motivation. If this is just a hobby and you don't want to take it seriously, then yeah for sure just do it when you feel like it.

What he said!  I came back to shooting sports after a long hiatus and now just do whatever comes up and have fun instead of being frustrated for not having my "A game".  To each their own!

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Maybe it would be beneficial for you to shoot a few less matches and instead dedicate that time to dry or live fire instead. Shoot a match every other week and use the "off" weeks to go live fire practice, along with dryfiring regularly. Not sure what your practice schedule is like, but you would probably improve quicker doing that vs shooting a match or multiple matches per week. Obviously Jake and Brian know way more than I do, but I figured I'd throw it out there. Also, make sure you are staying mentally sharp while practicing

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On 4/5/2017 at 7:14 PM, Jake Di Vita said:

It depends on what the goal is. If your goal is to take it seriously and really improve, then the vast majority of the time you should do it even when you don't feel like it. Discipline is 100 times more valuable than motivation. If this is just a hobby and you don't want to take it seriously, then yeah for sure just do it when you feel like it.

I would have to agree. Even if you don't feel like it and you are making mistakes, you can still learn from them. Also a day on the range beats any other day!! 

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On 4/5/2017 at 3:37 PM, Bkreutz said:

If you want to improve your USPSA skills, I wouldn't recommend doing other disciplines (IDPA, Steel) they can be confusing. It's kinda like practicing a bad habit. Not knocking either one of them (I've done both) but the difference can mess with your mental game. Weeknight matches would depend on how they're set up. I do one that uses USPSA rules (sort of, on an inside range, it's tough to duplicate outdoor stages)

Steel Challenge is good because you will get 40 draws and 160 transitions.

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