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aahunt03

in your opinion...

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There's a wealth of knowledge in this thread, thank you. I especially like the idea of practicing pertinent match skills. Analyzing my dryfire, i probably do too many draws and DA trigger pulls. And my best improvement comes when i call my shots in a match. I'm still working on honing that and doing it on every target though

Daniel K

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Also, leaning how to practice speed and accuracy independently of one another. That took a huge amount of frustration out of practice.

(Thanks, Steve Anderson!)

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Learn how to get a good sight picture and shoot bullseyes and then work on speed. Develop good sight picture, front sight focus on far targets and on close targets point and shoot as fast as you can.

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Taking Max's class was great, but only after I started practicing what he laid out for my training (live & dry fire) did i start to really see and feel a difference. Good luck.

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Read Brian's book

1. Learn to see everything faster

2. Dry fire practice

3. Video

4. Transitions and movement

5. Shoot more than you can afford--practice

6. Practice

7. Shoot as many matches as you can

Practice

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For me the biggest leap in skill I experienced was from taking a class. There are lots of people who can help you shave years off your learning curve. Find one you like, save up the money, and go.

Until then, you need to take a hard (and very honest) look at your own performance and figure out the one thing that's costing you the most time. For example, it won't do you much good to shave .2 off your draw if you can't call your shots, have to take three pokes at every popper, and get 5 Ds per stage.

Early on I was extremely fast but dropped tons of points. Eventually I figured out that my own problem was in stage programming (as opposed to planning). I would program the pace I imagined shooting, and I found myself shooting that pace regardless of what I saw. Now I program the acceptable sight picture for each shot I plan to fire. The speed ends up being the same in most cases, but now I know where all the bullets went.

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not pull the trigger unless the sights were where they needed to be and how they needed to be for that particular shot. the discipline to let that change and adapt and accept it, at speed and on the fly.

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Dry Fire every day...

Grip the gun hard...

Realize that speed will only come if you practice outside your comfort zone..

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The one thing I see in this entire thread is "commitment."  When we are committed to something we identify where we need to improve and seek out the resources to make that improvement.  At some point in my shooting career I decided I was committed and THAT'S the one thing I did to really improve.  (this may have been the point at which I decided to get a USPSA tattoo! HAHA!) 

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Buy Steve Anderson Books. Practice the dry fire and live fire drills regularly. Create a real practice schedule. Listen to his podcast for all sorts of tips and good info on how to improve your mental game.
Call your shots and shoot at your current level of skill on match day.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Just want it bad enough. You will figure it out. 

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On ‎8‎/‎18‎/‎2014 at 5:56 PM, aahunt03 said:

What is the single best thing you have done to improve your shooting abilities.

time behind the gun, live and dry fire practice.

 

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On 10/14/2016 at 1:59 PM, rowdyb said:

not pull the trigger unless the sights were where they needed to be and how they needed to be for that particular shot. the discipline to let that change and adapt and accept it, at speed and on the fly.

 

Sights every time, even on close burner targets. Dry fire practice watching the sights on transitions and the draw and etc....sights sights sights.

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On 8/18/2014 at 2:56 PM, aahunt03 said:

What is the single best thing you have done to improve your shooting abilities.

Learn what it means to call your shot on every target at any distance. Then always do that. 

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18 minutes ago, benos said:

Learn what it means to call your shot on every target at any distance. Then always do that. 

 

Agreed. I think trigger control is drills are never shot enough. 

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On 5/22/2016 at 7:47 AM, FTDMFR said:

Developed the ability to diagnose my own problems and then design drills to work on them.

 

And being brutally honest in your self assessment

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1 hour ago, Jumprun13k said:

 

And being brutally honest in your self assessment

 

Always striving. 

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I'm hitting my first year anniversary since starting to shoot uspsa - around 40 matches this  year.

My training method at this moment is writing down my stage plans and taking video of stages and then comparing the two later - and then thinking what did I do well, where did the plan fall apart and why, and how/where can I shave time.  I'm starting to think stage plans need to include lots of detail.

Anyone know a good online resource / links -  or is that getting too personal?

 

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13 hours ago, scroadkill said:

I'm hitting my first year anniversary since starting to shoot uspsa - around 40 matches this  year.

My training method at this moment is writing down my stage plans and taking video of stages and then comparing the two later - and then thinking what did I do well, where did the plan fall apart and why, and how/where can I shave time.  I'm starting to think stage plans need to include lots of detail.

Anyone know a good online resource / links -  or is that getting too personal?

 

 

40 matches? That's awesome. Are you training in addition to shooting matches?

 

What sort of resources are you looking for? Help stage planning? 

 

 

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16 hours ago, scroadkill said:

I'm hitting my first year anniversary since starting to shoot uspsa - around 40 matches this  year.

My training method at this moment is writing down my stage plans and taking video of stages and then comparing the two later - and then thinking what did I do well, where did the plan fall apart and why, and how/where can I shave time.  I'm starting to think stage plans need to include lots of detail.

Anyone know a good online resource / links -  or is that getting too personal?

 

 

Not really answering your question...but if you want to improve your skills then stop shooting so many matches and trade those for practice days.  Matches are not practice.  Matches do help in ways such as stage planning, stage experience, mental preparedness...but its not practice.  Matches are just a way to judge your current level of skill.  If you want to get better at skill X, you must spend time on focused practice on skill X.  Then go shoot a match to realize that skill.  

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The biggest improvement in my game came from practicing mag changes during dry fire time. I save wear and tear on the mags by dumping them over the bed. Saves on the stooping too.

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18 hours ago, CrashDodson said:

 

Not really answering your question...but if you want to improve your skills then stop shooting so many matches and trade those for practice days.  Matches are not practice.  Matches do help in ways such as stage planning, stage experience, mental preparedness...but its not practice.  Matches are just a way to judge your current level of skill.  If you want to get better at skill X, you must spend time on focused practice on skill X.  Then go shoot a match to realize that skill.  


I also host private outlaw matches where I can adjust focus on fundamentals - usually on area that are giving me the most trouble.  I can use this range for solo live fire practice when time permits. I'm guessing my ratio is 1 real match per practice session or outlaw match but I hate going more than a week without a real competition of some sort.

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re:  What sort of resources are you looking for? Help stage planning? 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
yep. I'm doing well on shooting everything I shoot at, 80%A no mikes/no fte  - My splits and reloads are solid and not an areas I'm worried about.
I'm closing in on 75-80% of division winners time-wise.

I'm in the hunt for more efficient stage plans and execution.

Today I'm going to try to break down stages into

being really aggressive on the beep - the draw and the first 2 steps - really popping coming out of the box (NEW)
counting targets per positions,
target order per position - L to R or R to L, hard to easy, far to near etc, cardboard then steel etc.
identifying good entry and exit targets per position,
gun up in work space and on target on entry target (NEW)
really popping out of positions on exit (NEW)
identifying good targets for shooting on move,
eliminating shooting positions when possible (NEW)
reload visual queues
and # of steps / low quick shuffle between positions (NEW)
minimizing number of steps. (NEW)

rehearsing the plan  while resetting/pasting and
REALLY visualizing the plan on the make ready (NEW)

comments welcome.

Edited by scroadkill

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