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RaylanGivens

Best Distance to Zero Glock 34 Sights for USPSA Production Shooting?

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I'm changing the sights on my Glock 34 USPSA Production gun from fixed sights to Dawson Precision adjustable sights... When I originally installed the fixed sights, I neasured them to be in the center of the slide and adjusted my hold to shoot at different distances. Not very scientific... I'd like to zero in my new adjustable sights more accurately.

Is 25 yards always the preferred distance to zero sites in for USPSA shooting?

I calculated the trajectory for a 147gr 9mm bullet shot with an initial velocity of 911 fps and zero'd to 25 yards. It looks like the 25 yard zero point would yield POA = POI accuracy at both 10 yards and 25 yards.

147grBulletTrajectory_zps72e3a1ff.jpg

Judging by the trajectory chart for the ammunition I shoot, it appears that bullet trajectory doesn't really play a part in accuracy (for USPSA shooting) between zero and about 35 yards.

It seems to me that zeroing the sights in at 25 yards would be the way to go... Especially since they will also be zeroed in at 10 yards... Does that sound reasonable? Do most of you USPSA shooters zero your sights in for 25 yards?

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It seems to me that zeroing the sights in at 25 yards would be the way to go... Especially since they will also be zeroed in at 10 yards...

As you mentioned, trajectory doesn't play much of a role in 9mm shooting for USPSA sports.

From your chart, it's evident that a 10/25 yard zero is down 2" at 50 yards.

The trickiest part of USPSA shooting, re: trajectory, is the Very Close head shot ...

if your sights are 1" above the bore, at very close range the bullet will hit 1" lower

than your sights - shooting close head shots quickly can (and does) lead to

shooting just below the head area on the target (Miss). This is especially true

with optical sights where you may miss by 2.5" - huge on a head shot.

Sighting in for anywhere from 15 - 25 yards is common, and leads to very little

difference. My guess is if you sighted in for 25 yards, you'd be unable to detect

any change necessary for 10 yards or 40 yards.

The trick is to sight it in, and see where it shoots at 5yards and 50 yards, and then

you'll be all set to go.

Big mistake, IMHO, that people make, is look at your chart and sight the gun in

at 10 yards, thinking they'll be very close at 25 and 50 yards. For some reason,

that hasn't been my experience. Seems to me that sighting the gun in for the

farthest distance is much superior (IMHO) and that all closer points will fall in

line perfectly.

I use to sight my SS .45 in for 50 yards and it was within a few inches at 10

and 25 yards. Whereas, when I sighted in for 25 yards, it was low at 50 yards:

Doesn't make sense, but it happened.

My recommendation is to fire some of those distant shots as well, to confirm

that you're centered at 40 - 50 yards - it's usually an eyeopener. :cheers:

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Sarge   

And another thing to factor in is figuring out what are the typical ranges to targets in the majority of the matches you shoot. Most club matches don't shoot 35 yard mini poppers very often but they shoot a crap ton of 5-15 yard targets. Might be ahead to always be dead on for those ranges and know your hold for a long range target.

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I installed my Dawson adjustable sights (with a .300 front) and zeroed them at 25 yards... The Dawson sights are tighter than the Sevigny sights I was using... That, along with the 25 yard zero, helps shooting 6" plates at 20 yards... which we do a fair bit of...

Thanks for the advice...

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I installed my Dawson adjustable sights (with a .300 front) and zeroed them at 25 yards... The Dawson sights are tighter than the Sevigny sights I was using... That, along with the 25 yard zero, helps shooting 6" plates at 20 yards... which we do a fair bit of...

Thanks for the advice...

That's what I sighted in for is plate racks. I measured the distance the plate rack is normally placed at and sighted in at that distance. I notice a lot of the misses people had on the plate rack were low, hitting the rack itself. I have mine set so that a hold dead center, gives me a hit dead center of the rack.

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I couldn't HIT and hardely see a target accurately in the same spot at 25 YARDS unless I got lucky with a standard pistol. haha Let alone zero it The sights practically cover the entire target; assuming typical USPSA style-targets.

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gennaro   

Go with what events you shoot the most at. I shoot a 34 and rarely do I see anything at 35 yards, so I ended up sighting the gun in at around 15 to 18 yards and it works the best for me in all th local matches I shoot, ( providing, I acquire the proper sight picture before sending one , lol ).

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set your elevation at 15 yards but check the windage at 35 and shoot it from 7 to 35 so you will know just what it does where. The perfect range to set the elevation for really depends on the loads and the sight height above center of bore. Then see if you can shoot a target that is dark or shaded vs. in the sun light. Lighting and background color changes how much light you can see through the rear sight. It can change things drastically if you don't watch how good your sight picture is when shooting darker targets

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That's what I sighted in for is plate racks. I measured the distance the plate rack is normally placed at and sighted in at that distance. I notice a lot of the misses people had on the plate rack were low, hitting the rack itself. I have mine set so that a hold dead center, gives me a hit dead center of the rack.

Holding dead center makes plate racks and small plates at long distances easier for me, too... You have some leniency on small poppers, but a single small plate or a plate rack at distance is very unforgiving...

I couldn't HIT and hardely see a target accurately in the same spot at 25 YARDS unless I got lucky with a standard pistol. haha Let alone zero it The sights practically cover the entire target; assuming typical USPSA style-targets.

I used sandbags to steady the gun when I zeroed the sights... That way the gun is aligned correctly, so all I have to do is aim well and pull the trigger straight back...

You should always be able to see the top of the target above the dights...

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This should be a math exercise. I ran your chart at 50y and immediately liked that better than your 25y chart. I don't want to hit low, starting at 25y. Hitting within an inch high at the middle yardages...I actually prefer that.

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I shoot both USPSA and GSSF and have always preferred to sight in at 25 yards from a rest. I've never had problems with head shots, Texas stars, plate racks, or anything else that could be attributed to the gun/sights and not my shooting skills (or lack thereof).

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