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benos

December

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benos   

Since it's been so long since we had a trivia question, and it is the holiday season and all... I asked the Mods to help me come up with one.

Here it is:

What is the most valuable shooting lesson that you have learned, here or anywhere?

The Mod team (including me) will pick our favorite answer.

This should make a fun thread, and a highly informative one too.

And since it is the holiday season, instead of a book, the winner will get a $100 eCoupon for my store.

:cheers:

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When you pick up a firearm nothing else in the world matters except the execution of a safe accurate shot if that is what is called for or to lead by example to the younger shooters and non-shooters alike,keeping in mind you join a long distinguished line of marksmen dating back to the beginning of time,and with great responsibility conduct yourself always as the face of that long line.

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What I've learned is that it is more valuable to share your experience with the newer shooters and encourage them to do the same. Although we all come from different backgrounds, family, and what not, we are all one family in the shooting world.

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Modoc   

I do not know everything and the deeper that I go, the less I know. BUT I do have some jems and expertise in areas that others do not, so to pay it forward, I offer input in the areas that I do know about. Like any good teacher, I learn as much from helping as I do from learning from someone else.

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Keep your finger off the trigger.

Never point the gun at anything that you're not planning on shooting.

The gun is ALWAYS loaded until you prove otherwise.

Shoot it like you stole it. :D

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Sarge   

First lesson of the day- Even though it doesn't look it, BB's from a BB gun actually do put little holes in plate glass school house windows at 50 yards.

Second lesson of the day- A red rider will break completely in half if your dad really wants it to.

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cyprant   

Not to over simplify things, but:

Front Site, Press. Repeat.

I am in need of some more valuable lessons, which is why I would spend the whole $100 on books.

Edited by cyprant

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JimmyZip   

The sight is your speedometer.

I wanted to post this. That is it. When I show up to a shoot and I'm all practiced up, or I haven't shot in months, this mantra will let me shoot as well as I can at that moment.

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In your book you talk about driving a car in a state of mushin. A pistol can be driven the same way, you just can't have any ego attachments to your performance. Just drive, just shoot. It won't make you better than you are, but you will perform your best....

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Alan550   

The trigger is an eraser! You can have everything else perfect; sight picture, stance, breath control, grip, etc, and the trigger can erase it all with just the wrong touch at the wrong time.

Alan~^~

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Hits on paper don't matter. Go fast so the video looks awesome and you get your "hits" on YouTube.

And don't worry about the little stuff. It can be fixed in post.

Edited by Alphamikefoxtrot

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From Lanny Bassham (paraphrased, with my own input added): The mind can only focus on one thing at a time. In (USPSA/IPSC) shooting, it should be "shoot all A's". The rest is just to distract you from that goal. The same is true for any endeavor and life in general. Whether it be your job, career, family, relationships, etc - determine what is essential and focus on it.

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ivan   

When I first started shooting in the early 80's, my mentor Cal and I would do “leather slaps”. We’d set up one tin can each, and when someone shouted ‘go’ we both draw our six-shooters and blast. The first one to knock down the tin can wins.

A friend, Bill, dropped by with his Browning Hi-Power, and asked to join in. I setup two tin cans and offered to start: Cal with his revolver and Bill with 13 rounds of 9mm. As they prepped to shoot, Cal turned to me and said “watch this, there’s a valuable lesson here”.

I shouted “go” and Bill and Cal both slapped leather. Mere seconds later, Bill stood there with his slide locked back, 13 rounds of brass on the ground and his tin can still standing. In that time Cal very deliberately drew the gun, cocked the hammer and methodically bulls eyed the tin can with one shot.

Cal turned to me and said “Always aim. Spray and pray just doesn’t work.”

I responded that if Bill had gotten lucky and connected with even one of his 13 rounds, Cal would have looked really foolish.

Cal responded:

“He missed. I aimed. ALWAYS AIM!”

… I think of that in many many situations. No matter how pressing the circumstances feel: always aim.

-ivan-

Edited by ivan

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JD45   

Solid skills come from countless repetitions. Emotions have nothing to do with the shooting.

.....paraphrased from Steve Anderson

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