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Trim Die for 300 Blackout

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I am contemplating buying the Dillon trimmer for .223 and 300 Blackout. Brian advises me that Dillon doesn't make a trim die for the 300 Blackout. Does any other company make a trim die for 300 Blackout? Thanks

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I am contemplating buying the Dillon trimmer for .223 and 300 Blackout. Brian advises me that Dillon doesn't make a trim die for the 300 Blackout. Does any other company make a trim die for 300 Blackout? Thanks

I'm looking to do the exact same thing.

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According to the description from the CH4D website the File Trim Die is useful when a considerable amount of material needs to be trimmed off the top of a case after forming operations. The case is run completely into the die, and what projects out of the top of the die can be sawed off and/or filed smooth. So can I use these same dies to trim factory ammo that I've shot and now need to trim it back to specs?

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According to the description from the CH4D website the File Trim Die is useful when a considerable amount of material needs to be trimmed off the top of a case after forming operations. The case is run completely into the die, and what projects out of the top of the die can be sawed off and/or filed smooth. So can I use these same dies to trim factory ammo that I've shot and now need to trim it back to specs?

I think I may just order the die from CH4D and try it. I will post after I get it all setup and let you know how it works.

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jonblack   

I have had the CH4D 300 Whisper trim die for a couple of years. It works fine and it will work for making 300 Blackout brass.

Yes, you do need to but down your tool head. I just bought an extra one and cut it down using my router.

jonblack

Edited by jonblack

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joelogic   

+1 for CH4D and the toolhead mod. Be aware that removing 10mm of brass can be hard on the motor and Dillon only warranties it for 1 year, this is why people are charging a premium over brass processing to make 300BLK brass.

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There are videos on YouTube showing people chopping the 223 cases down with a small power saw before forming so not as much is removed upon final trimming. This is likely the rout I'd take if I were making 300 Blackout brass.

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Turnpike   

I bought a 1050 from Brian to help speed my process up. I have a trim die from Brads Warehouse for the 300 Blackout. I did not see any pre-modified toolheads out there so I did my own (I figured if I had to buy one, might as well look at the cost to buy one already modifiied). I found it was easy to modify my toolhead. In fact I am getting ready to run my first batch of 223/556 to 300 blk this week. I need to get up and running so I can hit the range.

Mike

I have heard the same success is had with the CH4D dies. I had a set for my 458 socom and they worked great.

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Braxton1   

I am not a fan of trimming. In my opinion, it is a necessary evil perpetrated upon the shooting community by Satan himself. With that said, I am a big believer in doing it with power tools....

Check out www.littlecrowgunworks.com and see the "W.F.T." trimmer. It is available for most calibers and only costs roughly $70 complete. It is as simple to operate as an electric pencil sharpener. Insert the case. When you feel resistance stop, give the case a quarter-turn twist. Done. Move on to chamfering, if you wish.

I power mine with a bench-top lathe. A lot of folks just use a hand-held power drill.

They are available in a wide selection of cartridges, including .223, .308 Win., and .300 AAC Blackout.

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dillon   

Keep in mind that using a Dillon RT1200 to trim the entire .500" or so off of a 223 case WILL destroy certain internal components of the trimmer. This constitutes abuse, and is not covered under warranty. Please use a different method (cutoff wheel, bandsaw, etc) to trim the bulk of the case down, and use the RT1200 only to remove the last .025" or less. This is the reason Dillon does not offer a trim die for 300 Blackout, as we are seeing too many users attempting to process 223 brass into 300 Blackout soleely using the trimmer, then they complain that it doesn't hold up. The trimmer is intended to typically remove .010" or so of brass is all. If you destroy a trimmer we know specifically which parts will fail, then you will unjustly blame us when we refuse to replace it.

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I'm assuming its from taking all of it off at 1 time and heating up and wearing the motor. Instead of taking one long deep cut, could you just take several smaller cuts and still be fine?

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Me?

I have a Powermatic metal cutting bandsaw. So if I were to ever form Blackout brass, I would make a jig from a 2x4 block and use a drywall screw in the bottom of the hole to control the depth of the case inside the block.

Using the Dillon 1200 trimmer is horribly inefficient in my opinion and taxes it way too much.

I bet that little saw from harbor freight is in the $50 to $100 ball park, if that.

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Intel6   

If you have a metal cutting bandsaw you can put 10 cases in a stripper clip and rough cut down 10 cases at a time.

Neal in AZ

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dillon   

One of our customers drilled holes in a 2x2 to press the cases into, then uses a bandsaw to shorten about 50 cases at a time before forming and trimming.

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A dumb...dumb... Dumb question, pardon the drift...

What if you got .223 "cases" that hadn't had the neck and shoulder formed just yet... Basically, it would look like a very long straight walled pistol case.

Then you necked and shouldered it down to take a .308 bullet.

You would have more case volume than the .300 Blackout, which would theoretically give you more gas to drive the lighter weight 120, 130, and 150 grain bullets even faster, super sonically, and give you a trajectory that wasn't so rainbow like.

I am ASSuming that a normal .223 case's neck is too thin to make it stretch out to accept a .308 bullet.

I am also ASSuming that I am not the first one to think of this.

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300_aac_blackout_300blk_11.jpg

Yeah.... I don't know much about internal ballistics, so I have no idea how far a bullet can invade the internal space of a bottlenecked rifle case.

I was thinking it would be possible to have the case mouth right at the start of the ogive.

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From left to right.

300 gn Berger OTM Hybrid for 338 Lapua.

223/5.56

300 Whisper/Blackout case.

300 Whisper loaded with a Sierra 220 gn Matchking.

7.62x40 Wilson.

The original 300 Whisper ammo was formed from necked up 221 Fireball brass. Plenty of neck left even after being necked up to 30 caliber.

DSC03039.jpg

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Thanks Tom. I know if there is one person on this forum who could answer .300 Blackout ammo or case forming questions, it would be you. :cheers:

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Keep in mind that using a Dillon RT1200 to trim the entire .500" or so off of a 223 case WILL destroy certain internal components of the trimmer. This constitutes abuse, and is not covered under warranty. Please use a different method (cutoff wheel, bandsaw, etc) to trim the bulk of the case down, and use the RT1200 only to remove the last .025" or less. This is the reason Dillon does not offer a trim die for 300 Blackout, as we are seeing too many users attempting to process 223 brass into 300 Blackout soleely using the trimmer, then they complain that it doesn't hold up. The trimmer is intended to typically remove .010" or so of brass is all. If you destroy a trimmer we know specifically which parts will fail, then you will unjustly blame us when we refuse to replace it.

Sorry to bump an old thread, but I was hoping dillon would see this question in regards to this topic: I plan on buying the RT1200 trimmer with a 300 blk trim die, but I am definitely going to take your advice and cut the bulk of the brass off first with a chop saw. My question is this: after cutting with chop saw, the edges will be rough. Will I have to clean them up by chamfering before trimming in the RT1200? Or will it be ok to put the brass straight from the chopsaw into the trimmer? Thanks!

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If your chop saw blade is sharp, it should make a clean enough cut that won't harm the trimming blade on the Dillon trimmer. That's how I form Blackout brass. You'll be fine going from the chop saw right to the trimmer.

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