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NicVerAZ

Anyone got a 650 as a very first press?

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I am looking for comments from those who started with a 650 right off the bat.

How much difficulty did you have setting it up and did you get good reliable ammo from the get go?

Thanks!

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I got the 650 as my first press.

My advice. Find a friend who has one. Bring pizza and soda. I don't drink when I'm reloading. Have him walk you thru the process. I reloaded several hundred rounds that night. Worked out the kinks.

Next I bought mine, it was so much easier having seen one in operation to know what to do. Everything is set up for you from the factory.

I bought thru benos. Awesome customer service. I just bought a 1050 today off the forums.

Good luck

Sent from my Nexus S 4G using Tapatalk

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+1 Raysracer

I loaded 1000 .45's on a friends 650 and bought one a couple weeks later. It was my first press, and i don't regret it.

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My 650 was my first "brass" press, I had a MEC shotshell loader first so I'm going to say that the 650 was my first press. I bought mine used with 6 different die sets. I seemed to fall right into loading on it pretty easy and I'm going to credit that with the fact that I watched and read everything I could find on loading with a Dillon press (YouTube has a ton). Do some research and watch a bunch of videos, after you get the press you will learn little tricks to make your loading easier, you will get the "feel" of it like how it feels when your primer sets correctly and how it feels when your de-prime stage is a little stiff but you know when to push through. The Dillon is a great press for me, I do a ton of 45acp and 9mm which both run really good through the press. I seem to run into some problems and have to go nice and slow with .223 loading. About 1 in every 5 cases doesn't get pushed onto the shellplate correctly and gets tipped over.

Get a Dillon you will be very happy and customer service is phenomenal, the no BS warranty really is no BS. Like I said I bought mine used and they still replace parts that are questionable in order to make my press run good. I did sell my 12ga and 20ga MEC loaders and bought a Dillon SL900 shotshell loader with 2 and 20ga dies which is based on the XL650 platform, works great also.

This guy has some good info and good quality videos to watch on the Dillon 650 (and other loaders), just click on the "Dillon" tab at the top of his page. The Ultimate Reloader

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My first press and intro to reloading was with a 650xl

I love it.. Honestly the press I purchased from Brian came fully assembled for the caliber I ordered..

So other than mounting the case feeder installing the dies and may screwing in the primer system the set up was a breeze..

I didn't have any friends to show me the ropes of reloading..

All I had was Brian's DVD on competition reloading and a loading manual..

Honestly running a 650 is brain dead easy..

Jams are rare and super simple to fix (if they do happen its usually the case feeder)

There are two parts that commonly break..

Decamping e clamp.. Which is like 2 cents to replace and can be found in any hardware store..

And a return spring underneath the shell plate, which is a little tricky to install but requires no disassembly..

I went against everyone's advice to go with a single stage press for my first machine and got the 650 instead..

I don't regret it all..

As far as learning to load ammo, there are to silly mistakes I made that cost me some frustration and here they are...

1) oal will vary

Don't freak out if you set your press to load at one oal and you notice some variation.

It's more than normal to get variations of +-0.05

Much time can be spent worrying about this common non issue

2)don't get any case lube inside your cases (this goes twice if your using dillon lube in the pump bottle)

Allot of this lubed claim to not affect the powder but they do..

I took me for ever to figure out why my loads would randomly be 200 fps under velocity..

To much lube inside the case was ruining my powder..

If you can use one shot and apply the lube in a way that it doesn't get inside the case..

I like to stack the brass mouth down on a card board box and spray generously :)

Anyway, get your 650 and enjoy, what calipers will you be loading?

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+1!

Find a local friend with a 650 (thanks basman), go load up some ammo.

While it is not as wide ranging as a 550, and wont produce the same as a 1050, it is an awesome production machine.

The whole 800 rounds an hour is an easy pace. You can average without pushing at all, 25-30 rounds a minute until you need to refill primers. The pinned 650 thread has lots of tips and tricks that work well. Buy from our host, 650, the "as it should be" package, casefeeder, and you are rolling.

On top of that, Dillon's warranty is just what they say it is.

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I got a 650 as my first loader. You could make an argument that it has been more than I've needed, not being a super high round count shooter, but its been awesome. I would do it again in a heartbeat. I didn't have anyone but this forum to walk me through it at the time. If you can find a reloading mentor, by all means go get one! I managed to bulge my glock barrel with the first load I did from a squib. It taught me some very good lessons very fast. You have to be super detail oriented and able to focus on the task at hand. Get help and then don't look back.

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The 650 was my first press. I know they don't recommend it but it's not all that hard. I did use their DVD to set it up very often. I still use it if I have some questions. I also ask plenty of questions of one whom know. I don't really load for hundred of rounds a week but will load when I can. So if a half an hour here and there is what I got because of 4 kids a fast machine is the answer. You can go slow enough to do it safe but fast enough to get some quality rounds out. If I didn't get the 650 first I would have sold whatever I had and got the 650 now. Just do it right the first time :)

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My first press was a 650 that I purchased from Brian. I had a good friend and experience 650 user set it up and I've never looked back. Thousands and thousands of trouble free reloaded rounds since then.

Edited by SV-COP

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My first press was a 650 that I also bought from Brian. He was great to talk to b/c he advised me on other things that would be helpful with my first press. There is a VHS video made by Dillon that stars Brian Enos that was extremely helpful in setting up and running my press. I watched the video twice and everything went smoothly on my first batch of 45acp.

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650 was my first ever look at a reloading machine. I watched the dillon video on setting it up and was up and running at first crack. Also this forum has many common problems you might have already answered, if you do a little searching.

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I had loaded using a single stage Lee press and decided to go with the Dillon XL 650. It was a little overwhelming when I unboxed it, but followed the manual for setup and started cranking out .40 and .45 ACP with no trouble. Just watch carefully if you have a stoppage, remember you are working with 5 stations on every pull of the handle.

I also bought from Brian. He helped a lot. He recommended I take some things off the order and add a couple other things, he was right!!! Check out Brian's kits that are "as things should be", the roller handle and rigid mount are good.

I have been working up some 300 Blackout loads and using a Lee Turret press to do 50 or 60 at a time. I had to order a few extra parts to load the 300 on the 650 (powder funnel, bushing...). What had taken an hour on the Lee Turret press, took about 10 minutes on the 650. Major difference. I ended up loading 250 rounds with 3 different bullet types and 3 different powders in less than an hour. That includes powder adjustments. You will not regret a 650, unless you decide to upgrade to a 1050.

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First press was a lee pro 1000. Went straight to the 650 after that. If I were to do it again and $ was not a deciding factor, then the 650 would be the first for me. Definitely have a good idea of what is going on before you start, but there are plenty of utube views for that.

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I started with a 650 about a year ago and couldn't be happier! I got the Dillon setup video which made setup easier. I went back and fourth between the 550/650, I would have been disappointed if I had not gone for the 650 right out of the gate. The 650 is an outstanding machine, I was cranking out good ammo right away! Start slow and don't worry about speed and you will do just fine.

I am looking for comments from those who started with a 650 right off the bat.

How much difficulty did you have setting it up and did you get good reliable ammo from the get go?

Thanks!

Edited by fishdude

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650 was my first press, no problem adjusting to the learning curve. IMHO people who suggest a single stage or non-indexing press for a first press are the same type who would suggest an automatic transmission automobile or a revolver for every woman shooter. Slightly steeper learning curve, yet more long term satisfaction.

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+1. Started with a used Dillon 650. Totally agree with the above suggestions- I got a shooting buddy who had been loading with a 650 for years to come over and help me set it up and get my first load worked and and running... All for the cost of a pizza and beer. Between his help and buying and watching Brian's reloading video, I was good to go with the 650.

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Thanks, all.

Being a noob in the sport, I don't know really know anyone in my area who can show me, it seems I will have to learn on my own.

Hey, it's ok, I taught myself software engineering and now make a good living doing it... I guess I can learn on my own. I am stubborn.

I have looked at both the 550 and the 650... I am not only interested in shooting 9mm but also 357... I love revolvers. And I also love shooting bullseye (I think there is nothing better to learn trigger control), my dream is to get a good used 45 set up for BE, I may also eventually load that caliber and you know how BE shooters like to experiment with their ammo.

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If you plan on reloading in high volume I would suggest getting a 650 over the 550. The 650 auto rotates the shell plate, the 550 does not. When you sit down to load 1000+ rounds in one session, not having to manually move the shell plate between every pull of the handle becomes a significant time savings.

My first and only reloading press is a 650 and its perfect for what I need it for. I ordered my 650 from Brian Enos in the "As it should be" configuration. I usually load between 50,000 - 60,000 rounds a year on this press and it works flawlessly.

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Yes, just got my new 650 set up about 2 weeks now and can't say enough about the tec support from Dillon. Great guys over there, very curious and helpful. Reloaded about 2-300 rounds in 308 on my neighbors 550. Trimming cases and hand loading each case one at a time in a tray because he did not believe the press would throw accurate powder. Very time consuming to say the least. I no longer have to endure that pain of going so slow. I would only get 50 rounds done in one sitting because of all the redunant measuring and case handling over and over. I got it all put together and I had to beg him to come over and help me set up my dies because I thought it would be a walk in the park for him. You won't believe this but the first case he tried to size got stuck because he did not let the case sit out for the recommended time not knowing Dillon case lube. He freaked out and said "I can't deal with this! I'll buy you a new die" He went home and said I could borrow his case puller. This was my initiation to the reloading world :) Yikes! I had a hell of a time just getting the primer punch and the neck sizer out so I could drill and tap the prime pocket. this was the worst thing that could happen to a newbe reloader and a very tough learning lesson. Be sure to lube your cases but if using Dillon case lube, it needs 4-5 minutes standing time after spraying lube on.

I love my 650. I bought it with 308 and 223 quick change kits and stands. The only thing is, it is very addicting. After only having it set up for 2 weeks I just ordered the 1200B case trimmer and trim dies for 308 and 223. A new tool head and stand, 9mm quick change kit, 9mm dies, case feed plate for small pistol,new depriming pin, some bins and a bunch of other stuff too. So beware. It's easy to get caught up in all the cool stuff because the fun never ends. Enjoy, it's a great new hobby for me and you will not regret buying the 650.

Many smiles and God Bless :)

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I started with a 650. If you take your time it should be ok. I used the video and you tube to help get it set up. This forum is also helpful with lots of tips. I have loaded a couple of thousand and I am still learning. It would have been nice to have someone that had the press close by to help with questions.

Will

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No but now I wish I would have, but really not much to complain about my 550B.

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I am not new to the principals of reloading. Between my father and helping with load development for the USMC as a shooter I am well versed in the range side of testing ammo. But I have only had my own press for about a year. My second press was a dillon 650 (3 weeks ago) and it's not that hard to get set up. There are plenty of you tube videos explaining each step in the usual calibers. IMO the hardest thing to set up was the powder dispenser, which wasn't hard. The case feeder and carbide sizing dies are awesome additions. If your loading straight walled pistol cartridges check out the youtube techniques for not spilling powder loading in 9mm. Overall I wish I would have bypassed the rcbs press I got first and saved the cash. Once you get the press and die sets dialed in for your load it's amazing how fast you can produce ammo for your monthly/ weekly matches. I tried to make lots of 10 rounds (load testing) and found myself having to be careful not to over run the 10 rounds.

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I started loading on a 650 with a case feeder just a couple of months ago and with great success. At the time I didn't know anyone who used this press so I got the Dillion installation video. I took it very slow at first by only running one piece of brass through all 5 stations, carefully observing the operation of the press. I did this to make sure that I understood what happened at every step of the operation, and how the press worked at each of the stations. It's critical that you understand what happens at each of the 5 stations.

It wasn't very long before I was comfortable with the 650 and I was loading better than factory ammunition progressively.

Here are a few suggestions/tips:

  • Purchase the installation DVD
  • Purchase the spare parts kit - a must
  • Make sure that your press is level and clean
  • Do not overtighen anything - snug is sufficient
  • Get the strong mount - highly recommended
  • Get the optional roller handle - highly recommended
  • Avoid all distractions (music, TV, pets, etc.) when loading
  • Make sure that your press is stable - the strong mounts will also help
  • Make sure you get the station 3 powder check system - a must for safety
  • If your budget allows get a second primer punch assembly - primer conversions are a snap
  • When leaving the press for any reason ALWAYS leave the press handle in the down position so when you get back, you will ALWAYS properly seat the primer during the next cycle

Just take your time and you'll be fine.

Safe and happy reloading !!!

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My first was also a 650. I started slow to learn the press. I just got it last week. Adjusting the dies takes a little time, but once your set up your golden.

Prior to any session I take mulitiple powder measurements to makes sure the grains are good to go. I love this press and glad I chose the 650 I don't have a case feeder yet but I am sure to order one for massive amounts on ammo for my Subgun

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