Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!
Patrick Scott

Did my parents hurt my ability to let loose?

Recommended Posts

So a couple of times I have been able to let loose at a match, but only when I am mentally drained or physically spent to the point my head is empty. This results in my best runs. It seems that some of the safety stuff I was taught as a kid need to be "put away" at a match. It is hard for me to explain, but someone must know what I am talking about. Any tips for getting over it? I am not talking about the real safety stuff. Mom and Dad always taught me not to run around with a gun, don't do quick draws, don't shoot from wacky positions. I know I can and have done all this stuff safely at matches, but there is still a mental roadblock in my speed that I feel comes from this. Give me a verified empty gun and I will do this stuff as fast as my body will allow, but as soon as I get a "hot" gun I slow down for safety sake. Uhg, its bugging the heck out of me. Maybe I am wrong and its something else? Maybe I am still "green" and just need more time behind the gun at matches?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Skydiver   

I've got two separate thoughts about your post:

Thought 1:

Thank you for being conscious about safety. I think your parents laid a good foundation, and you are working on top of that. You have to walk before you can run. (Although watching some the talented young shooters around, it seems like they started running the moment they could stand up.) Build on that foundation and safety will become an automatic fundamental. With that fundamental skill in place, you can pick up speed and instinctively know your limits.

Thought 2:

When you said that you slow down because you have "hot" gun, that means that you are back to "thinking" rather than "observing" and letting yourself be creative. Brian (who thankfully hosts this wonderful forum) has several good chapters in his book about creative shooting and going beyond the fundamentals.

Edited by Skydiver

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's all in yer head. :D Nascar drivers turn and burn all weekeend then hop in their Luxery Mercedes and mosy on home. Just let the little devil on your shoulder bind and gag the angle for a couple hours and let 'er rip. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sarge   

i was able to dump the cumbersome parts of 20 years of military range safety so I think you will eventually overcome the issues.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i was able to dump the cumbersome parts of 20 years of military range safety so I think you will eventually overcome the issues.

+1

Although not 20 years of military, the only range procedure I knew was from learning to shoot in the academy. (Police) Many of those "disciplines" (fears) carried over to USPSA. For example, reload only when told, shoot in a stable standing position (in a booth) and DO NOT DO ANYTHING UNTIL WE TELL YOU TO!!! I know the reasons are for safety but when trying to let loose at a match they can hold you back. I got over this by more time at matches which translated into complete confidence in shooting how we do. Also, becoming a better USPSA shooter than all of the range staff helps too!!! B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More matches, not a problem ;)

I wonder if the fact I dry fire now with only fully weighted mags(dummy rounds) will have some effect on this in my mind, should be interesting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK. Obviously they have, or you wouldn't be posting here. You need training and classes in IPSC/USPSA shooting. The best firearms trainers are unusually instructors who also shoot IPSC. Not a lot of them. I've seen too many firearms instructors who don't wear weapons and don't demonstrate, so their credibility is stretched. Yeah, old timers can watch you shoot and critique, but you need someone to actually show you how to run with the gun, run forward and backward with the gun. How to get down and shoot low, how to shoot around barricades.How to prep the trigger. How to make transitions from one side to the other. How to look at the magwell when you reload (not at the imaginary threat downrange), how to run a timer and run you through drills. Ask around, you may need to travel a few times and take some classes, watch all the videos you can-Matt Burkett's are good, You tube has some good ones-Dave Sevigny's IDPA skills video is the best demonstration of skills I have ever seen. But, you live in an area where there has to be some property you can just cut loose on and learn what you can and can't do. And still be on target and not break the "180" It may be hard to find someone locally to train with you, but you never know.  Grew up just down the road from you and since like age 10 used to take my single shot .22 out to our range every day (two cords of wood against a granite overhang) and my dad used to say "don't point the gun at anyone, no hunting, and keep it unloaded". I have had some other training since then, but the basic is get the bullets down range, fast. Nobody really just lets loose, they have just trained to the point where everything is done unconsciously-so its faster than walking through it consciously. There is no shitstorm from hell cutting loose on you. It's a very controlled USPSA match.DVC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't disagree with anything you said there. Last year was my first year in the sport and I took a class held by and Open GM and Production M halfway through the year. They hit on all the points you described. I picked up a lot of mechanics in class and ideas to build off as I gained more experience. I have Burkett's vol 1-3 and watch it every so often, even spoke on the phone with him(great guy). By "let loose" I mean let loose control and let everything flow without trying for a good run. I think you and I are speaking the same language on that, just different accents(mine being noob). Funny you mention land.. one of my other topics today was about this nice little piece of land my family has that I am putting in a one bay private practice range on. My family has shot there since before I born and I want to get a little more serious about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mda   

More practice and matches will solve the problem, after all you have only been shooting one year. You are basicly not comfortable will the movement involved with USPSA shooting and thinking to much while doing it.

MDA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
t0066jh   

So a couple of times I have been able to let loose at a match, but only when I am mentally drained or physically spent to the point my head is empty. This results in my best runs. It seems that some of the safety stuff I was taught as a kid need to be "put away" at a match. It is hard for me to explain, but someone must know what I am talking about. Any tips for getting over it? I am not talking about the real safety stuff. Mom and Dad always taught me not to run around with a gun, don't do quick draws, don't shoot from wacky positions. I know I can and have done all this stuff safely at matches, but there is still a mental roadblock in my speed that I feel comes from this. Give me a verified empty gun and I will do this stuff as fast as my body will allow, but as soon as I get a "hot" gun I slow down for safety sake. Uhg, its bugging the heck out of me. Maybe I am wrong and its something else? Maybe I am still "green" and just need more time behind the gun at matches?

Hi Patrick

Based on only 10 classifiers, you may be expecting too much too quick. Focus on getting your hits and moving smoothly as quickly as possible from one shooting position to the next. Ramp up your speed as you feel you can do it under control. When you start shooting over 90% of the points available, ramp it up some more. Watch the better shooters, they don't waste a lot of movement. They plan their shooting positions and get there quickly, gun up and ready to engage their first target.

Enjoy the process. It's supposed to be fun.

Joe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
benos   
Maybe I am still "green" and just need more time behind the gun at matches?

Before I got to that, that is what I was thinking from reading the beginning of your post. Even if you didn't have parents that told you not to run around with a loaded gun - it's a little nerve racking when you are new to the sport. It just takes some time to learn to blend safety with confidence.

be

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JKSNIPER   

Patrick...you could try attending classes at Gunsite or Thunder Ranch if feasible for you to do so.

You'll shoot a LOT there so bring bandaids and stuff for the Oweees you'll experience.

I've had instructors who demo stuff quick and hit the high points so you can absorb it and get back to shooting right away and then there are the ones who use demo time as their own personal range time.

Bottom line is dry fire a LOT and get to the range when you can and practice.

"How do you get to Carnegie Hall ? Practice kid....practice."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tracker   

I remember thinking the same things when I first began. I also was taught never to run with a loaded gun, take your time never shoot fast, and just blasting away was a waste of ammo. The biggest impact left on me from attending a match was how many safety measures are taken......I was impressed! Try to attend a match with the GMPS guys......well run and a a great bunch.

Have fun!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been shooting with GMPS for almost a year now, great bunch for sure.

The Feb. match went very well with respect to this topic, getting better for sure. Managed my second Production stage win.

Thanks everyone!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JimmyZip   

Patrick you looked good at the last match. Nice and smooth.

There you have it. Sounds like this problem is fixing itself. Cool. :cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JimmyZip   

I think it is the dry fire. When I started to do that, I found that things just started to get better. Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PKT1106   

Patrick - I know what you mean. When I first started, I was really green and paid attention to every safety rule there was and move very deliberately. Did this slow me down? Yes. Was it part of the learning? Yes. As I attended more matches, I got a better feel for the flow of the courses and was still able to maintain safety because of my familiarity with the surroundings. I have had a few courses where I was able to just shoot and the safety fell into place and they are coming more and more frequently as I keep shooting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×