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For 9mm MAJOR Topics

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To improve search results, If the Topic you start is about a 9mm Major load, please include:

9mm Major

... in the Topic's Title.

be

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To improve search results, If the Topic you start is about a 9mm Major load, please include:

9mm Major

... in the Topic's Title.

be

Thanks, Brian, appreciate it.

I think there are two good reasons for this, as

some people have pointed out:

1. makes searches easier

2. differentiates between 9mm minor and major

(many posts don't mention which they mean,

and you have to know by experience which

is being discussed) - this is a safety

issue for new reloaders.

I think this will help a bit.

Jack

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What is the difference between 9mm Major and Minor. I'm new to this and just don't know. Thanks

Major = 4 EXTRA GRAINS OF POWDER, 124gr at 1378 fps and 115gr at 1500 fps versus minor at 1000 fps for 124gr or 1140 for 115gr.

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What is the difference between 9mm Major and Minor. I'm new to this and just don't know. Thanks

Major = 4 EXTRA GRAINS OF POWDER, 124gr at 1378 fps and 115gr at 1500 fps versus minor at 1000 fps for 124gr or 1140 for 115gr.

Coco, I think that's not quite what he asked/meat.

USPSA has 2 separate power factors in which you can shoot (in pistol, anyway), Major and Minor. Major power factor ammo scores higher than minor power factor ammo. Major power factor is anything 165+, where as minor is everything under 165 down to 125. This is how the power factor is calculated: you take the velocity of the round (as fired through a chrono), and multiply it by the weight in grains of the bullet (before firing), then divide by 1000. This requires that a bullet be pulled and weighed. So, a 180 grain bullet, going 1005FPS has a power factor of 180.9 (180 X 1005 / 1000= PF). Minor is generally used in production division, as all rounds, regardless of PF, are scored minor, so people generally load down as low as they can go, to make the gun easier to handle.

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Is there anyway you can make a separate forum area for Open Gun loads vs Production / IDPA loads.

Every time I read the forums I notice guys mixing the two together. Having major and minor in the same forum just seems to create a hazard for newer reloaders.

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Hi all, I have the opportunity to buy some Hogdon HS7 but don't have any data for 9mm Major,I have been loading HS6 under 124 FMJ's with good success.Does anyone have any data for HS7 & 9mm Major..Any help will be greatly appreciated. :mellow:

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OR, and this is just a thought, why don't we start two special topic boards, one for 9mm minor and the other for 9mm major, so we don't have to search?

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The Glock guys pretty much have to. I shoot a Cheely 9mm and I am only at 1.168

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The Glock guys pretty much have to. I shoot a Cheely 9mm and I am only at 1.168

Ah I knew it was a dum question. Mag Dimensions. Not everyone shoots a SVI/STI

Thanks!

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I'm looking for some 9mm major data using powders others than AutoComp for use in a "Shorty". I have some HS6 on hand along with some WSF. And I have easy access to everything out there with the exception of VV 3N37 and N320. My WAC loads work so this isn't an emergency situation or anything. I'm just interested what some of the rest if you are running in your "Shorty" open guns.

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One more thing, I notice alot of guys shooting 9mm major in 2011's are using small rifle primers. Why? Is there any advantage over small pistol or magnum small pistol?

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One more thing, I notice alot of guys shooting 9mm major in 2011's are using small rifle primers. Why?...

Generally speaking, small rifle primers have a harder and thicker cup. They take a harder strike and are less prone to primer flow and piercing. Maybe just a bit safer for such hot loads? Are they using primers from a particular manufacturer?

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Small rifle primers (Winchester). I use them for 9mm minor/major loads for 2 reasons. 1st. I load .223 and only need to buy one primer, 2nd. I figure I'm getting a better burn with 9mm major. (I do use a long firing pin in my 2011 pistol). I don't use rifle primers in a stricker fired pistol as they seem a bit hard.....

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The difference for 9mm major or minor and the use of small RIFLE primers in major is about pressure. Rifle primers are meant to contain higher pressures than pistol primers. Since small rifle and small pistol primers are the same size, they can be substituted for use in pistol calibers that normally use small pistol primers (Not so with large rifle vs. large pistol primers). However... and this a big however, pistols with lightened mainsprings may have some problems igniting small rifle primers. Rifles have much heavier striker falls than almost all pistols, so they can gleefully ignite the sturdier small rifle primers. If you use only small pistol primers (SP) and are generating pressures in excess of those for which they were designed several things can happen. 1) The primer will flow or fill completely the primer pocket as well as flatten which thins the back end of the thing and may lead to a punctured primer (They almost always back out a bit upon ignition and are pushed into the breech and firing pin harder under more pressure... much depends on the firing pin dwell time too) which will release gas into the gun or perhaps onto you. 2) The edges of the primer will leak under pressure and, once again, gas which you don't want in places it should not be will affect your shooting and eventually your gun (gas cutting of the breech). So remember that small PISTOL primers are meant for pressures under 35,000psi or so, while small RIFLE primers are good to go up to about 50,000psi or a bit more. If you load to pressures in excess of 35,000psi you will probably want to consider the use of small rifle (SR) primers in your gun. Hopefully you have the hammer fall velocity to set them off.

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The difference for 9mm major or minor and the use of small RIFLE primers in major is about pressure. Rifle primers are meant to contain higher pressures than pistol primers. Since small rifle and small pistol primers are the same size, they can be substituted for use in pistol calibers that normally use small pistol primers (Not so with large rifle vs. large pistol primers). However... and this a big however, pistols with lightened mainsprings may have some problems igniting small rifle primers. Rifles have much heavier striker falls than almost all pistols, so they can gleefully ignite the sturdier small rifle primers. If you use only small pistol primers (SP) and are generating pressures in excess of those for which they were designed several things can happen. 1) The primer will flow or fill completely the primer pocket as well as flatten which thins the back end of the thing and may lead to a punctured primer (They almost always back out a bit upon ignition and are pushed into the breech and firing pin harder under more pressure... much depends on the firing pin dwell time too) which will release gas into the gun or perhaps onto you. 2) The edges of the primer will leak under pressure and, once again, gas which you don't want in places it should not be will affect your shooting and eventually your gun (gas cutting of the breech). So remember that small PISTOL primers are meant for pressures under 35,000psi or so, while small RIFLE primers are good to go up to about 50,000psi or a bit more. If you load to pressures in excess of 35,000psi you will probably want to consider the use of small rifle (SR) primers in your gun. Hopefully you have the hammer fall velocity to set them off.

Thanks for this explanation!!! I picked up 1000 CCI SRP yesterday and I'm planning to run some test loads with them later today. My 2011 hasn't failed to set off any SPP's and I've used all the major brands. Hopefully this remains true with the SRP's.

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OR, and this is just a thought, why don't we start two special topic boards, one for 9mm minor and the other for 9mm major, so we don't have to search?

This...!

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I'm newer to reloading, but isn't it kind of dangerous loading a 9mm to Major PF? if a manufacturers max data load is 4.8 for something, do you really want to push it much past that? Plus how does brass hold up to 9mm major load? Not trying to criticize, just trying to understand. Thanks.

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Not all 9 major loads are created equal, with a slow powder like 3n38 and a barrel with no holes you can actually make major with a 9x21 book load. The faster the powder the further outside the book loads you have to go; holes in the barrel and/or short barrels take more powder.

Its actually safer than you might think, I've found when you push a slow powder too hard it just stops gaining velocity. I'd bet there had been more blown up guns with 40 major, super fast powders and heavy bullets. With something like 3n38 you cab fill the case to the brim, jam a bullet down and shoot it without issue.

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