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JoeGlocker

Brass per pound?

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jmorris   

If you would like to know how many rounds of brass you have lying around, as I did, you can use the information below. If anyone wants to count them out to see how close my calculations are let me know what you find out.

9mm, 59.46gr/ea, 117.7cases/#, 8.5#/1000

38spl, 68.06gr/ea, 102.8cases/#, 9.7#/1000

40s&w, 70.1gr/ea, 99.9cases/#, 10#/1000

.357mag, 78.3gr/ea, 89.4cases/#, 11.2#/1000

.45acp, 89.58gr/ea, 78.1cases/#, 12.8#/1000

.223, 95.28gr/ea , 73.5cases/#, 13.6#/1000

.44mag, 114.38gr/ea, 61.2cases/#, 16.3#/1000

50bmg, 865.26gr/ea, 8.1cases/#, 123.5#/1000

All weights are uncleaned fired cases with the primer remaining.

Individual case weights were derived using an average of mixed brass weights (except 50bmg)

So, if you picked up 8#s of 45 brass: 8# X 78.1cases/# = 625 cases+/-

If you use 1gal ziploc freezer bags to store your brass, each (full) bag contains:

9mm, 15.6#, 1836cases

40s&w, 12.2#, 1219cases

45acp, 11.4#, 890cases

223, 11#, 809cases

If you use 5gal buckets each full one will have

9MM = 8500-9000 pieces

.40 S&W = 7000-7500 pieces

.45 ACP = 3800-4000 pieces

a few more

CASES per POUND:

.380: 145

.357 Sig: 96

.45 GAP: 86

.32: 168

10mm: 96

FN 5.7: 124

.25 acp: 260

.30 Luger: 120

.38 S&W: 120

.38 Super: 104

9mm MAK: 124

.45 Colt: 60

.30-M1: 100

.308: 40

.30-06: 35

7.62x39: 54

.50 AE: 48

.30-30: 52

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CocoBolo   

Hey a post in time to save me money. A local salvage yard has 9 mm brass for $4.00 a pound, everyone thought what a great deal well NOT that is $34.00 a thousand and it is not even clean. Better deals elsewhere..

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Ok, I'll admit, I'm not the smartest guy in the world, but I did score in the 90 percentile on the math portion of the GRE.

I get the part that says how much each case weighs, but what does the rest of it mean?

9mm, 59.46gr/ea, 117.7cases/#, 8.5#/1000

This is what I'm reading;

- 59.46gr divided by each...each what?

- 117.7 cases divided by a number....what number and where does 117.7 come from?

- 8.5 multiplied by a number, divided by a thousand.....what number and where does 8.5 come from?

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nwb01   

Ok, I'll admit, I'm not the smartest guy in the world, but I did score in the 90 percentile on the math portion of the GRE.

I get the part that says how much each case weighs, but what does the rest of it mean?

9mm, 59.46gr/ea, 117.7cases/#, 8.5#/1000

This is what I'm reading;

- 59.46gr divided by each...each what?

- 117.7 cases divided by a number....what number and where does 117.7 come from?

- 8.5 multiplied by a number, divided by a thousand.....what number and where does 8.5 come from?

9MM

1 single case(piece of 9mm brass) = 59.4 grains

117.7 cases(pieces of 9mm brass) = 1 pound (#)

8.5 pounds(#) of cases(pieces of 9mm brass) = 1000 Cases(pieces of brass)

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Ok, I'll admit, I'm not the smartest guy in the world, but I did score in the 90 percentile on the math portion of the GRE.

I get the part that says how much each case weighs, but what does the rest of it mean?

9mm, 59.46gr/ea, 117.7cases/#, 8.5#/1000

This is what I'm reading;

- 59.46gr divided by each...each what?

- 117.7 cases divided by a number....what number and where does 117.7 come from?

- 8.5 multiplied by a number, divided by a thousand.....what number and where does 8.5 come from?

It reads:

9mm, 59.46gr PER ea, 117.7cases PER pound, 8.5 pounds PER 1000.

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Miranda   

I think he was asking for this:

7000 grains = one pound

about that 4 dollar a pound price,

I paid 3 dollars a pound for scrap brass recently....

so.... I suspect the price of brass cases will continue to escalate.

buy sooner over later.

v

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Ok, that makes sense. I know there are 7000 grains in a pound, it was just the use of "#" in the place of "pounds" and the use of "/" in the place of "=" that was screwing me up.

I've just never seen those substitutions before.

Thanks for the clarification.

BSG

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jmorris   

# for pound is common in the circles I run in, its also know as the pound key on your phone. I used the / as per just like in Km/h kilometers per hour. Sorry for the confusion

Edited by jmorris

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If you would like to know how many rounds of brass you have lying around, as I did, you can use the information below. If anyone wants to count them out to see how close my calculations are let me know what you find out.

9mm, 59.46gr/ea, 117.7cases/#, 8.5#/1000

38spl, 68.06gr/ea, 102.8cases/#, 9.7#/1000

40s&w, 70.1gr/ea, 99.9cases/#, 10#/1000

.357mag, 78.3gr/ea, 89.4cases/#, 11.2#/1000

.45acp, 89.58gr/ea, 78.1cases/#, 12.8#/1000

.223, 95.28gr/ea , 73.5cases/#, 13.6#/1000

.44mag, 114.38gr/ea, 61.2cases/#, 16.3#/1000

50bmg, 865.26gr/ea, 8.1cases/#, 123.5#/1000

All weights are uncleaned fired cases with the primer remaining.

Individual case weights were derived using an average of mixed brass weights (except 50bmg)

So, if you picked up 8#s of 45 brass: 8# X 78.1cases/# = 625 cases+/-

If you use 1gal ziploc freezer bags to store your brass, each (full) bag contains:

9mm, 15.6#, 1836cases

40s&w, 12.2#, 1219cases

45acp, 11.4#, 890cases

223, 11#, 809cases

If you use 5gal buckets each full one will have

9MM = 8500-9000 pieces

.40 S&W = 7000-7500 pieces

.45 ACP = 3800-4000 pieces

a few more

CASES per POUND:

.380: 145

.357 Sig: 96

.45 GAP: 86

.32: 168

10mm: 96

FN 5.7: 124

.25 acp: 260

.30 Luger: 120

.38 S&W: 120

.38 Super: 104

9mm MAK: 124

.45 Colt: 60

.30-M1: 100

.308: 40

.30-06: 35

7.62x39: 54

.50 AE: 48

.30-30: 52

What? No 5.56?? Under 'cases by pound'

Edited by jester116th

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jmorris   
What? No 5.56?? Under 'cases by pound'

I bet the .223 case is close enough and it's in the list above 73.5 per pound.

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