Barrelburns

1911 commander accuracy vs grip

8 posts in this topic

Hey guys, hopefully this is the right spot. Looking for a bit of help with my grip on my para elite commander .45. This is my 2nd 1911, first one was a 5" para chambered in .45. I put somewhere around 2500 rounds through my 5" and I thought I had a firm idea on how to shoot it well. I ended up selling the govt. and bought the commander. I feel as if I am gripping the commander the same as I did the govt, but my targets and poi say otherwise.

 

My average groups went from 3-4" at 25 yards with the govt. to 6" or bigger at 9 yards with commander, and the center of the group is about 6" low. The only thing that seems to help is a loose grip, a way loose grip. Then the group tightens and poi raises. But the sights dont track and it doesnt feel natural. It seems to contradict everything I have read and experienced  with grip. 

 

I seem to shoot plenty of other auto pistols fine. What am I doing wrong?

 

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If you are hitting 6" low at only 27 feet, there are two possible causes: some sort of mechanical issue with the gun's sights or lockup or something like that. Let others shoot it and change the ammo used.

 

If that's not it, and it likely won't be the cause...

You're pulling the front of the gun down before the bullet exits the barrel. Stop doing that.

 

(From the "simple solutions aren't always easy solutions" file)

Edited by MemphisMechanic

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Hehehe. Great advice, thank you. I have run several types of ammo, including my go-to 200gr swc 4.2 bullseye load. I've had a couple of other 1911 owners shoot it as well, most with similar results. Just checking to see if there is something I may be able to improve. Yes, the right way is never easy is it. I bet I end up taking it to a smith, there is a bit of vertical slop at the hood.

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Try shooting it strong hand only.

 

Then GASP! Weak hand only. The weak hand is relatively speaking, a total idiot. You find you're paying attention to HOW to pull a trigger. Amazing what you notice when shooting offhand.

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Both my hands are idiots, ha. Good idea, I didn't think of that. I'll give it a shot next time. Maybe I'll use my left eye too...:)

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Flinching :-)

I have somewhat large hands and the grip on the commander feels short to me.  That in addition to the recoil, makes the gun harder to manage for me.  Because of that I have to pay extra attention to the trigger and sights or I tend to get sloppy.  If you are shooting better with the gun "loose" in your hand, I expect you are taking extra time to get a clean push on the trigger and keeping the sights clean while waiting for the surprise.  When you start gripping tight and preparing for the recoil you are likely not as clean as you would like on the trigger because you are busy trying to manage the recoil.  Thats been my experience anyway.

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Good timing, thanks for the reply Stealsack. I've  been trying to pay close attention on my heeling. I shot it yesterday and had a buddy load up some mags with random amounts. I was shooting while holding the slide stop down. Yeah, found out how much I'm actually flinching. I never really took into account the shorter cycle of the commander slide, had it in my head it was just a weight difference. What kind of dry fire practice do you recommend?

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Haha, it's always eye opening when you hit a empty chamber!

As you noted, dryfire will help a ton with that.  Also, you sound like you have a fair bit of experience so just spend some time working the trigger in live fire, then put it all together.

As you will hear a lot, the fact that the gun moves when you come up empty is not always bad trigger control, but hitting low and messy almost always is :-)

Everyone has been there!  I think it is harder in your case because you went from a full size that you probably shoot well to a shorty.

Dry fire: As much as you can :-)  The upside is that you WILL notice you shoot better right away.

The wall drill for the current issue is prolly best, then do some trigger pulls on various small items around the room.

Really, really make sure that the sights don't move when you press the trigger.  Grip the hell out of the gun!

When you get to the range, get your grip on, then relax everything not gripping the gun.  Lean in and just think clean break.  After you are comfortable with that, add sights and stance.  You are used to the flash and bang of the .45 so just put it out of your head and do the basics.

My guess is you will sort it quickly and be off and running in no time.

I have the Ben Stoeger books and I think they do a good job of selling the need to dry fire and he has a ton of good drills.

For me, I have to make it a part of my day and change up what I'm working so I don't get bored/lazy.

 

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