techj

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About techj

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  1. That's a hammer style I believe. After each rap of the hammer on a hard surface make sure that you check that case hasn't loosened. It should have come with instructions. You may need several really good raps with a loose grip on the hammer to work a bullet loose. Hard to describe in words. but it's more important to have the hammer move than how much force you use. Even a way over crimped bullet will eventually come loose - I know this from personal experience .
  2. You are using a bullet puller - either kinetic or collet type -- aren't you? It shouldn't be very difficult with the correct tool. No offense but it sounds like you don't have much experience in reloading. I would strongly suggest finding someone in your area with some experience and working with them. While not impossible, it is harder and potentially very dangerous to rely on forums, youtubes, etc. when first starting out.
  3. Always Glad to hear that you have the bullet feed/flare working. Re the seat & crimp, you should always adjust the seat depth first with no crimp. Then slowly adjust the crimp until it just removes the flare. Unless you are roll crimping for a revolver you will be taper crimping - more a removal of flare than anything else. You are not trying to compress or push the brass into the bullet. If your bullet is plated or coated lead then make sure that you are not cutting or deforming the coating - you will need to pull a bullet to check. Easiest way to check is to use a case gauge or better yet your barrel - REMOVED from your firearm and perform a "plunk test" which will also allow you to confirm that your seating depth is not too long for your firearm. There are lots of posts on doing a plunk test that you can find. You should also be checking the seating depth with your calipers to make sure that you are in spec per your reloading guide for your powder charge. Also, please note that when you crimp & seat with the same die that as you increase the crimp it may push the bullet deeper so your seating may require fine tuning as you go.
  4. I'll try to get some pix posted tomorrow or the next day as I am in the middle of reloading 308's at the moment.
  5. With a flared case in the station and the die unscrewed you should raise the ram and then screw the die down until it just touches, remove the case and then turn it down about 1/4 turn further - that should do it. If you have flared the case enough it should feed the bullet and the bullet should just sit in the case.
  6. If you have enough flare that the bullet feed die is working and the bullet is usually staying in place until seating then that's enough flare. If you are occasionally having the bullet fall out then perhaps the press isn't moving smoothly enough between stations. I'm assuming that you are using the PTX (powder through expander). If you are it is possible that it is sticking causing you to have to muscle through more than you need to and causing excess motion in the press. Sometime you need to polish the PTX and - depending upon how you're cleaning your cases - they may be too dry (no lube or carbon in side of the case mouth) resulting in excess friction.
  7. Depending upon the powder that you use - if it drops very consistently (i.e. Power Pistol, Bullseye, most Accurate powders) then once you have confirmed the powder drop you can just visually examine/confirm the fill of each case...that is what I do. I have an LED light setup so that I can clearly see the case before the bullet feed in order to confirm.
  8. I used a utility knife blade...carefully. But anything with a strong, thin edge should work.
  9. You probably won't need a grinding stone. First off - go slow & be careful as it easy to damage the collets (I know from personal experience). What worked for me with my bullets was to use some sandpaper on a dowel with the top collet until the bullet would just drop through. Please note that once you do this it will only work on that specific diameter bullet and you won't be able to use the collet for jacketed. Then on the lower collet I cleaned up the opening with the same sandpaper + dowel and then had to gently spread the fingers until the bullet would drop partially through the collet. Again go easy as I have also broken a finger off of a collet. Once I go to this point it was a matter of adjusting the die by following the instructions and then small changes in the flare of the cases. It won't take excessive pressure to run.
  10. I have an LNL and use coated bullets (The Blue Bullets) in 9 & 45 with their bullet feeder. I found that it worked best for me to seat and crimp in 2 different stations. Once you get it dialed in the bullet feeder works very well...getting there can be a bit of a challenge especially with coated bullets.
  11. On my Mark III the biggest changes that improved reliability were 1) removing the LCI (just left it out); and 2) replacing the extractor. After doing those 2 things - and staying with ammo that I know will work well - I have 100% confidence in the gun for steel challenge. BTW - I shoot CCI standard velocity and Federal Automatch almost exclusively due to reliability and availability.
  12. When I use the Microsoft Edge browser I can't enter anything into the text section on either post replies or new posts. It does allow me to enter tags & titles. Any ideas (other than using a different browser) ? Not only is it the default browser for Windows 10 but other than this problem on this site it works better than Internet Explorer. Thanks in advance.
  13. +1 on Beef15's advice to push the handle all the way forward. Only time I ever have a problem with primer seating is if the shell plate has loosened up. I have loaded over 30k rounds of pistol and a few k of rifle on my LNL.
  14. The action target store (formally LE Targets - https://shop.actiontarget.com/ ) has paper versions that are as low as $0.22 in bulk.
  15. I usually stock up based upon whichever component gets changed. For example, I have a case of 9mm bullets coming in and will load about a 100 with my existing powder & primer batches and if all is well will go on to load the other 3,500 from that order or until I have to start with a new batch of primers or powders. This reduces the possibility of introducing an unexpected problem due to a component change.